Tag Archives: alms

28 April: Little Flowers of Saint Francis XIX: The Riches of Poverty 2.

open-hands-prayer

(Continued from Yesterday) After begging through the town, Saint Francis and Brother Masseo met together to eat in a place without the city, where was a fair fountain and, hard by, a fine, broad stone ; upon the which each set the alms that he had begged.

And Saint Francis, seeing that Brother Masseo’s pieces of bread were more and finer and larger than his own, rejoiced with great joy, and said: “ O Brother Masseo, we are not worthy of such vast treasure ”: and when he repeated many times these self-same words, Brother Masseo made answer:
« Father, how can one speak of treasure where is such poverty and lack of all things whereof there is need ? Here is nor cloth, nor knife, nor plate, nor porringer, nor house, nor table, nor man-servant, nor maid-servant.”

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Quoth Saint Francis: “And this it is that I acount vast treasure, wherein is no thing at
all prepared by human hands, but whatsoe’er we have is given by God’s own providence, as
manifestly doth appear in the bread that we have begged, in the table of stone so fine, and in the fount so clear; wherefore I will that we pray unto God that He make us to love with all our
heart the treasure of holy poverty which is so noble, that thereunto did God Himself become your servitor.”

And when he had said these words, and they had done their prayer, and for refreshment of the body had taken of those pieces and drunk of that water, they rose up to journey into France.

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27 April: Little Flowers of Saint Francis XVIII: the Riches of Poverty 1.

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THE wonderful servant and follower of Christ, to wit Saint Francis, to the end that he might in all things conform himself perfectly unto Christ, who, as the Gospel saith, sent his disciples forth by two and two unto all the cities and places where He was himself purposing to go; seeing that after the pattern of Christ he had gathered together twelve companions, sent them forth by two and two to preach throughout the world.

And to give them an ensample of true obedience, he was himself the first to go, after the pattern of Christ who began to do before he taught. Wherefore having allotted to his companions the other parts of the world, he with Brother Masseo as his companion took the road that led to the land of France.

And coming one day to a town sore hungered, they went, according to the rule, begging their bread for the love of God; and Saint F rancis went by one street, and Brother Masseo by another. But because Saint Francis was mean to look upon and small of stature, and was deemed thereby a vile beggar by whoso knew him not, he got by his begging naught save a few mouthfuls and scraps of dry bread: but to Brother Masseo, in that he was tall and fair of form, were given good pieces, large and in plenty, and of fresh bread. When that they had done their begging, they met together to eat in a place without the city, where was a fair fountain and, hard by, a fine, broad stone ; upon the which each set the alms that he had begged.

And Saint Francis, seeing that Brother Masseo’s pieces of bread were more and finer and larger than his own, rejoiced with great joy, and said: “ O Brother Masseo, we are not worthy of such vast treasure ”: and when he repeated many times these self-same words, Brother Masseo made answer:
« Father, how can one speak of treasure where is such poverty and lack of all things whereof there is need ? Here is nor cloth, nor knife, nor plate, nor porringer, nor house, nor table, nor man-servant, nor maid-servant.”

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10 April: More vital than cake …

These days, I guess most of us think of an indulgence as something we can enjoy but do not really need. Like a slice of cake with your cup of tea. That’s a simnel cake, a sort of  English Easter version of the German stollen.  A daffodil for the risen Lord and eleven dots for the more-or-less-faithful  Apostles.

We know that there were no recriminations from Him in those weeks after Easter. They were forgiven. Full stop.

 

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So how the situation arose where people were selling indulgences, and many more people buying them, is hard to comprehend, except that if you were led to believe that paying down a week’s wages would secure your place in Heaven, well, What price would you pay?

That was an Indulgence in mediaeval times. Follow the link to an interesting article about an Indulgence on show in Manchester. And What price would you pay?

As our contributor Tom points out, you would readily pay a week’s wages for eternal salvation.

Here then is a connection to yesterday’s post, both about wartime, but this is a story of the aftermath of the Second World War.

The same day as I read this article I was in the Archive in Westminster diocese and found a 1947 exchange of letters between Miss Winifred Callaghan, head teacher of English Martyrs’ School in York and Cardinal Griffin in Westminster.

She writes:

Most Reverend Father,

Kindly accept the enclosed £1 as a small donation to your ‘Children of Europe’ fund, from the children and some of the staff of the above school.

We would have made it more but many local calls kept us collecting. But on Friday we had a quick whip round with ‘your’ box, as we call it, and £1 resulted.

We ask your blessing and a prayer for us all please. May God bless you dear Father, from the children and teachers.

And not an indulgence in sight.

How blest the children of York, to have had such a head teacher! The generosity of many people, rich and poor, can be traced in the correspondence. They were supporting Germans, as well as Poles, Hungarians, Yugoslavians, Estonians: people exiled from their homes across Europe, Germans stranded in the New Poland, many people who could not go home to what were now Communist countries.

Forgiveness freely given towards former enemies, and plain Christian charity.

And not an indulgence in sight.

MB. TJH.

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February 22: Little Flowers of Saint Francis XI: Brother Giles is cared for during a cold Lent 2.

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So Brother Giles and his companion gave themselves up to prayer, beseeching God with all their hearts that He would send them help in their great need. And God, who is all-pitiful, had regard unto their faith and devotion and simplicity and fervour, after this fashion.

A certain man that was looking towards the church in which Brother Giles and his companion were, being inspired of God, said within himself; « It may be that in yon church are some good persons doing penance, who by reason of the snow that hath so much fallen, cannot supply their needs, and by reason thereof may die of hunger.” And urged on by the Holy Spirit, he said: “Of a surety I will go and see whether my imagination be true or not”; and taking some bread and a bottle of wine, he set out upon his way; and with exceeding
great difficulty he came to the church aforesaid, where he found Brother Giles and his
companion praying most devoutly ; and they were so consumed with hunger that to all seeming they appeared rather to be dead men than alive, He had great compassion on them, and when they were refreshed and comforted, he returned and told unto his neighbours the
need and the distress of these brothers, and prevailed on them and prayed them for the love of God to make provision for them; so that many persons, following his example, brought them bread and wine and other needful viands, for the love of God; and all through that Lent they took such order among themselves that in their need they were provided for.

And Brother Giles pondering on the mercy of God and the charity of those folk, said to his companion: “My brother most dear, even now have we prayed unto God to provide for us in our need, and our prayers have been heard: wherefore it is fitting that we give Him thanks and glory, and pray for them that have nourished us with their alms, and for all Christian people!”

And for his great fervour and devotion, God gave such grace unto Brother Giles that many
through his example left this blind world, and many others whose hearts were not turned to the religious life, did much great penance in their own homes.

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21 February: Little Flowers of Saint Francis X: Brother Giles is cared for during a cold Lent, 1.

open-hands-prayer
We return to the Little Flowers today, with another Lenten story, this time about Francis’s follower, Brother Giles.

How Brother Giles was miraculously cared for in a time of great need, when by reason of the deep snow he could not go to beg alms

Brother Giles being at Rome in the house of a cardinal, as the time of the greater Lent drew nigh, and not finding such peace of mind as he desired, said to the cardinal: “My father, with
your leave, I wish to go for the peace of my soul to pass this Lent with my companion in some lonely place.”

Replied the cardinal, “Well, my brother most dear, and whither wouldest thou go? The famine is full sore; as yet ye know the land but ill. Come, be content to continue in my court, for right pleased shall I be to give you whatsoe’er you need, for the love of God,” Howbeit Brother Giles would fain be gone, and he gat him forth from Rome to a high mountain, where of old had stood a village, and still was found a deserted church that was called Saint Laurence, and he entered therein, he and his companion, and they continued in player and in much meditation.

They were unknown, and thereby was little reverence and devotion paid to them; wherefore
they suffered great want: and therewithal there fell deep snow that lasted many days. They could not go outside the church, and no man sent them aught to eat, nor had they anything
with them, and so they remained shut up for three days and nights.

Brother Giles seeing that he could not live by the labour of his hands and that he could not go out to beg for alms, said to his companion : “My brother most dear; let us cry unto the Lord with a loud voice that of His pity He may provide for us in this extremity and need, for certain monks being in great need, cried unto God, and the Divine Providence supplied their wants.”

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15 February: Remembering L’Arche India.

india feb2018 Dear Friends,

There have been a few posts from L’Arche India these last few months; if you’ve read those you’ll know something of their life and work. This is a Lenten Fund-raising Appeal. You’ll see above how one of the communities was devastated by a typhoon, and this in a poor country. Please consider directing your alms this Lent to L’Arche India. Click the link to find out more.

MMB

L’Arche India fundraiser

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12 September Eid-ul-Adha: The Holy Day of the Sacrifice.

sourate2-196-98b75 Surah II, 196. Al-Baqarah (The Cow)
‘Perform the pilgrimage and the visit (to Mecca) for Allah. And if ye are prevented, then send such gifts as can be obtained with ease, and shave not your heads until the first have reached their destination.

And whoever among you is sick or hath an ailment of the head must pay a ransom of fasting or almsgiving or offering. And if ye are in safety, then whosoever contenteth himself with the visit for the pilgrimage (shall give) such gifts as can be had with ease. And whosoever cannot find (such gifts) then a fast of three days while on the pilgrimage, and of seven when ye have returned, that is, ten in all.

That is for him whose folk are not present at the Inviolable Place of Worship. Observe your duty to Allah, and know that Allah is severe in punishment.’

The Holy Day of the Sacrifice: Aïd al Adha or Aïd el Kébir

Commonly called the ‘Eid-ul-Kabir’ (the Great Festival) in North Africa, it is also called ‘Tabaski’ in West Africa, ‘Tafaska’ among the Berber and ‘Kurban Bayrami’ in Turkey.
Eid-ul-Adha (the Festival of the Sacrifice) is one of the most important Muslim Festivals. Each year, it marks the end of the pilgrimage to Mecca and takes place on the 10th day of the month of Dou Al Hijja, the last month of the Muslim calendar. This year, the Festival is celebrated on the 12th September 2016 (in France). We are in the 1437th year since the Hegira of Mohammed to Medina. It lasts 4 days and is celebrated throughout the world. It is the Great (kabir) Festival of the Muslim world.

This Festival commemorates the submission to God of the Patriarch Abraham, who was ready to sacrifice his son at his command (Ishmael, according to Muslim tradition, or Isaac according to the Bible; the Koran does not make the name of the son explicit.)

On the eve of Eid-ul-Kabir, everything is purified; houses are cleaned from top to bottom; every cloth, down to the smallest duster, is conscientiously laundered.

Every Muslim family according to their means, sacrifice an animal (a ewe, goat, sheep, cow or camel) by slitting its throat while laid on its left flank, the head towards Mecca. A portion of the meat from this sacrifice will benefit the most destitute among the Muslims, thus asserting the solidarity and mutual assistance prescribed by Allah.

It is a day of reconciliation, where each one is invited to pardon whoever wronged him.

THE CALENDAR OF MUSLIM FESTIVALS

The dates listed are subject to a variation of one or two days according to the visibility of the moon in different regions. These festivities may provide the opportunity to our Christian communities to offer their good wishes for the festival to our Muslim neighbours, especially if there is a Muslim place of worship in the same locality.

This post is copied from the Missionaries of Africa’s website , where you can learn more about Islam and Christianity.                                                                                                                                                   MMB.

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Saturday 13th February: Follow the divine physician!

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Isaiah 59: 9b-14; Psalm 83; Luke 5: 27-32.

 

mercylogoToday is the fourth day of our forty-day journey through the wilderness of Lent. Today, the prophet Isaiah tells us that God repays each one in kind. When we bless others, especially those who have spiritual, physical and material needs, God in turn blesses us.

When the Pharisees challenge Jesus’ behaviour in eating with public sinners, Jesus’ defence is very simple. A doctor doesn’t treat the healthy, but the sick. A true physician seeks the healing of the whole person- body, mind and spirit. Every one of us is sick in our own way, so Jesus is here for us. What are we waiting for? Let us go to Him as broken and fragile as we are for He will make us whole. Jesus came as a divine physician and as a good shepherd to care for us and restore us through Him to the Father.

St. Paul says all have sinned and fall short of God’s glory (Romans 3:23). We need to thank the Lord for the great mercy that He has shown to us and endeavour to seek the good of all and show them mercy and kindness. If we give our bread to the hungry, and relief to the oppressed then our light will rise in the darkness. The Lord will always guide us and give us relief in desert places. We will be called ”breach-menders”. May we be ready, like Levi, to forsake all things to follow Christ, who calls us every day.

May we receive grace in this Year of Mercy so as to be merciful to ourselves and to our neighbours. May Our Lady Queen of Mercy pray for us. Amen.

FMSL

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12th February: Mercy, Not Sacrifice!

Francismercy poster

 

FRIDAY AFTER ASH WEDNESDAY

Isaiah 58: 1-9, Psalm 50, Matthew 9:14-15

mercylogoIn today’s first reading, the Lord tells Isaiah to shout to the house of Jacob, to tell them their sins. They seek Him, they long to know His ways, His laws and above all, they want God to draw near to them. They seek all these things with fasting and penance.

I think most of us do the same today. But what does God say to them and to us?  You oppress those that are under you.  You make people know that you are giving alms.  God is saying that this is not the type of fast that pleases Him.

God is telling us to be more loving in all our ways. God is telling us that the type of fast that pleases Him is when we have BENEVOLENCE, which leads us to love others for themselves, independently of subjective interest.

In the Gospel, John’s disciples are also concerned with fasting.  They even go to Jesus to ask Him why his disciples do not fast. Look at Jesus’ response: ”Surely the bridegroom’s attendants would never think of mourning as long as the bridegroom is still with them?”  Jesus’ way is LOVE and MERCY. If there is love and mercy in our hearts, we will not lack intimacy with God. We must also love inclusively, just as Jesus does, because we all are precious in His eyes. Our friendship with Him should lead us to look with His eyes; to suffer in His suffering and rejoice in His joy.  Seeing from His viewpoint, we will offer ourselves to work with Him for the good of all our brothers and sisters, rather than judging or oppressing them. That is what this Year of Mercy is about.

FMSL

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10th February, Ash Wednesday: A Change of Heart

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(Image from www.franciscanalliance.org )

Joel 2:12-18, Psalm 50; 2 Corinthians. 5:10, 6:2: Matthew.6:1-8,16-18

Ash Wednesday is the first day of Lent, marked by services of penitence.

The traditional purpose of Lent is the preparation of the believer through prayer, alms giving atonement and self-denial.

Literally, it means a change of mind and heart and attitudes.  This point is vividly illustrated by the first reading when the prophet Joel tells us, ‘let your hearts be broken, not your garments torn’ (Joel 2:13).

What does change of mind and heart mean, and how can we do it?  There is a sense in which we cannot effect it – all that we can do is to be attentive to God and let him do the transforming. A real change of mind and heart means an inner surrendering of my own life to God, so that whatever I do, I do in his Spirit: with him, for him and through him.

Alms-giving is a generic term which expresses the practical nature of our love for others.

In today’s Gospel, Jesus warns us against play-acting good deeds in order to be seen.

Fasting from wrong doing is more important than from food. There is inner fasting of the mind, which is letting go of past resentment, breaking down the barriers which separate us from God.  Like fasting, alms-giving is both a means which helps us to pray, and also the result of prayer. If our prayer is genuine, then the spirit of God takes hold of us and we shall begin to feel more at one with him and with creation.  We do not just fast and pray for people but give them a practical proof of our love which makes us ambassadors for Christ, as St Paul tells us in the second reading. Our hearts, like Christ’s will be moved with pity, and we shall begin to feel for our neighbours as we feel for ourselves. May God help us in conversion of heart this Lenten season Amen.

 

FMSL

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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