Tag Archives: Ascension

What does the Ascension mean to you?

I wonder what does the Ascension of Christ mean to you? For some we have that picture, often depicted in art, with Jesus’ feet disappearing up into the clouds; of the post-resurrection Jesus no longer being  physically present with the disciples, as he returns to his Father in heaven. But the disciples were not left alone, they were told to wait in the city, to then be “clothed from with power from in high”; I am sure they must have wondered what Jesus meant, but as ever they were obedient to his words. That must have been such a rollercoaster 40 days for them, since Easter Day; as it is for many of us today, but as we journey together through this we too anticipate Pentecost … in the meantime we have the novena, 9 days of prayer to look forward to.

God Bless and keep safe, keep connected and keep praying.

Rev Jo Richards, rector, Saint Mildred’s, Canterbury.

Upper Photo by CD, from the Chapel of the Franciscan Minoresses, Derbyshire; Lower Photo, MMB, priest’s vesting table, Church of Jesus in the Attic, Amsterdam. A reminder to pray for the Spirit before preaching.

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21 May: Ascension Day

Ascension and Pentecost

This window explicitly links the Ascension to Pentecost, ten days later. And there seems to be a female presence in the shape of Mary and another woman in each scene, which is as it should be, despite the Lectionary airbrushing the women out of the Pentecost day reading from Acts.

But today is Ascension Day – Why are you looking up into the sky? What do you expect to see?

Or we could put the Angel’s question another way: if you are looking for Jesus where do you expect to find him? Among the clouds; really? Whatever you do for the least of my brothers and sisters, you do it for me. It began with mutual support as the disciples continued to come to grips with all that had happened.

Here and now we can pray for the Spirit to fill our hearts with love, and give us eyes to see Jesus in our neighbours, family, friends.

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24 August: Saint Bartholomew

barts.rich.cast.ascension

It was Saint Bartholomew’s church, so I had half expected to see him represented there. But the church at Richard’s Castle in Shropshire is redundant, a sad old place. There are traces on the walls of pre=Reformation murals, and fragments of ancient glass, the images no doubt destroyed by zealous iconoclasts. Yet it was here in the Marches that our Saint of two days ago, John Kemble, worked as a Catholic priest until he was denounced in the wake of the Titus Oates debacle.

Well, of the five earthbound men in this image of the Ascension of Jesus from a Shropshire hill, the front right is Peter, with his keys; opposite him, next to Mary, is the beardless John. We can take Peter’s neighbour to be Bartholomew, why not? He was close to Jesus. He was soon huddled away in the Upper Room, until, filled by the Spirit, he made his way to India and Armenia with  the Good News, and was eventually put to death.

John Kemble, after training on the Continent, served the people of his own district as pastor; Bartholomew served far from home. Who will hear the Good news from me today? Who will I hurt through mistaken zeal? Who will feel my faith is redundant because of my poor example?

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5 October: The Will of Saint Francis

This post is by a great friend of Will Turnstone’s blog. Writing at Divine. Incarnate, Christina has a unique vision of Christian Faith and Catholic tradition.Find her here: Christina Chase Thank you Christina for sharing this!

We join Christina in the Canadian Shrine of Sainte Anne de Beaupré.

Francois.Anne. beaupre.1Will T.

In a shadowy recess of the Basilica of Sainte Anne de Beaupré, I caught sight of a dimly lit bas-relief and felt myself drawn to it… and even changed by it.

Before I get to that, shortly – below the carving is a small statue of St. Francis of Assisi taking the body of Jesus off of the Cross. Of course, it is historically inaccurate. But, great art depicts the truth within and beyond facts. The artwork is meant to convey the love and life of Francis, who was so utterly devoted to God-Incarnate suffering in this world that he even developed the Stigmata, signs of Christ’s wounds on his own body. Francis’s arms are therefore shown to be encircling the body of Christ as he is ready to lift up his beloved Savior and catch him in embrace.

Francis is on tippytoe in his innocent eagerness, gazing upward in adoration, his hand curved and held in gentle wonder.

And I ask myself: do I want to embrace Christ this much?

Am I eager to carry the weight of his beaten and bloody body? Do I hold him in wonder and affection close to my heart? I wasn’t there when they crucified my Lord, but I am here, now, when the dying are crying out in pain and loneliness, and the abused are losing hope that anyone will carry them to safety. Is my heart suffering with theirs in true compassion, ready to do whatever I can to help – not to hesitate, but to give generously in love? Whatever I do for the least, I do for Christ.

Francois.Anne. beaupre.2

As I wrote in the beginning of this post, it was the bas-relief above the statue that most deeply moved me. I had to look up at it a long while before I could discern the figures and details. While realizing what I was seeing, I felt the cords of my heart being so sweetly touched that the exquisite song of joy spread all through me. Below is the image, the image which I am taking as my Faith Facilitator for this First Friday:

At first, I saw Jesus with his arms open wide, crucified. And Francis, in front of Jesus like a child, held his arms open wide in imitation, looking back and up at his Savior as though asking, “Like this?” Christ, the patient teacher, and Francis, the willing student. But, then… I saw that there were wings depicted behind Jesus, signifying Christ Resurrected, Christ Glorified and Ascended in Paradise. And I knew that Christ Jesus was teaching his beloved child… with open arms, a living Cross… how to fly….

Prayer:

Oh, my Lord and my God,

teach me to be little,

your little child,

so that I may grow big and strong like you.

Amen.

 

 

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May 27th 2016: Personhood V.

ASCENSION (490x800)

CD.

We are exploring the notion of personhood and its relationship to love.  Yesterday, we asked how we can be united to others without losing our identity?   Today we will explore this by looking at our union with Christ.

We are united to Christ though love – his love for us first, and our response.  By love, we choose independently to unite ourselves to the loved one.  We do not lose our independence; rather we express it through our free choice to give ourself to the other and receive the other into ourself.  This is what Christ did in becoming man.  It is an unfathomable mystery, but nonetheless true: he became man and in so doing, he chose freely to share his very being with us.  Since his resurrection and ascension, this takes place sacramentally, through Baptism and the Eucharist; but we are not meant to be passive recipients of this great gift.  Love engenders a response and we respond to the love of Christ for us by our life of prayer and faith – and simply by giving our whole selves to him.  In this way we grow in our relationship with him and realise ever more fully that in his birth we are born; with his life we live; and in his death we die.  We exist authentically as persons with a vital interior life because and by means of his love for us.  The French Jesuit Henri de Lubac (1896 – 1991), one of the great theologians of the twentieth century, says simply: ‘We are fully persons only within the Person of the Son.  He will never cease to make us complete, to make us persons in himself.’

SJC

 

 

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January 26th – Timothy and Titus and Christ’s Ascension

ASCENSION (490x800) 

Jesus’ Ascension is described at the beginning of Acts of the Apostles, but people often suppose it was mostly a matter of returning to God to prepare for sending the Holy Spirit. These two windows together suggest exactly that. However, we can see from the letter to Timothy that it meant much more than that to the New Testament community in Corinth. That city had been a Greek achievement, a place of engineering sophistication, through which a great canal had been excavated, improving its trading capability. The Eastern Mediterranean was joined more easily to the West. The Greeks thought they appreciated and could imitate the harmony of the heavens, the spheres of planetary movement. But by Paul’s day, the Roman Empire had taken over and wrecked that notion of mechanical harmony with mechanical oppression.

The world then felt worse, claustrophobic. The spheres of the sky creaked around badly as if controlled by demons and destructive powers. But 1 Tim. 3:16 records for us the hymn, sung in Corinth, about Christ removing this stifling experience of life. Christ has ascended, breaking the obsolete spheres, overcoming the spirits of fear and threat.

“He was manifested in the flesh,

vindicated in the Spirit, seen by angels,

preached among the nations,

believed on in the world,

taken up in glory.”

The message of hope contained here includes the gift of readiness to remove our neighbours’ fears. It is community guided by the Spirit which matters, not the trading opportunities and the economic advantages which favour a few over many others.

 CD.

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