Tag Archives: Churches Together

24 January: Praying together.

 

Arthur Hinsley.jpg

 

At primary school before the Second Vatican Council, we learned, even if it was not expressly taught, that we should not pray with Protestants or non-Catholics. Yet the witness of the four chaplains was not a mere straw in the wind, but a sign of the Spirit at work.

In May 1941, no less a personage than the Cardinal Archbishop of Westminster, Arthur Hinsley, publicly led a mixed gathering of Christians, including Bishop George Bell of Chichester, in the Lord’s Prayer, when they heard the news of an air raid. His fellow bishops disapproved, but the Spirit was at work there too. Throughout the war, Christians worked and prayed together under difficult circumstances. Even then, the Spirit was at work.

May we all be one!

MMB

Arthur, Cardinal Hinsley, from Wikipedia.

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23 January: Church Unity Week, Behind this door …

 

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Behind this garage door is a garage, as you might expect, but this is London, where you can expect the unexpected.

In this case, the archives of the Archdiocese of Westminster. There’s a postern within the door that a researcher can be let through, then past the car and into a warm welcome from the archivists.

Public Domain, via Wikipedia

The archives hold material from well before the Archdiocese came into being in 1850, including works of Bishop Richard Challoner, 1691-1781, who was Bishop in London when Catholics still were not supposed to exist, so he lived and worked in secret, ever in danger of arrest or attack. He wrote extensively for his flock, including a catechism, a revision of the Douay Bible translation, and the Garden of the Soul, a prayer book designed for people who had to live for long periods without the Sacraments or a priest visiting.

In this week of prayer for Christian Unity, let us thank God for the freedom to worship enjoyed in Britain today, and pray for those Christians elsewhere who may not worship as their conscience and loyalty lead them to.

Here is a page from the Garden, describing how to start the day. Not bad advice at all, though parents may feel it’s not entirely practical! It’s the coffee after they’ve left the house that allows a moment of morning offering for some of us; but read on!

Challoner p17.

MMB.

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January 20: WEEK OF PRAYER FOR CHRISTIAN UNITY: WELCOMING THE STRANGER.

church unity week poster pic.

The memory of a liberated people, that they were once enslaved, should compel us to welcome the stranger in our midst. The experience of Biblical Israel resonates with the experiences of the peoples of the Caribbean region, the majority of whom were once slaves. We remember how God restores the dignity of God’s people and the churches of the region play an important role in reminding their society of the duty to welcome refugees and displaced persons.
Leviticus 19.33-34 You shall love the alien as yourself

Psalm 146 The Lord watches over the strangers

Hebrews 13.1-3 Some have entertained angels without knowing it

Matthew 25.31-46 I was a stranger and you welcomed me
REFLECTION We are good because we are loved, not loved because we are good. If it was up to each one of us to earn it, we might not be loved very much. Too much goat and not enough sheep. And yet loved we are, since God is in all things, even the bits we think are ugly and unmentionable. We are loved, but God wants us to give some love back, giving and receiving in a mutual relationship. Love makes us better holds us together reaching out to the other. Being in relationship with God means being with other people, doing some good. Looking after the creation and not seeing everything as being there for our enjoyment. It means being fair and not exploiting others. It means giving and not taking. It means being alongside not overpowering others. It even means welcoming and respecting the stranger in our midst since it may be the Christ unannounced.
QUESTIONS How have you experienced being a stranger? Have you visited another church (perhaps whilst on holiday)? How were you welcomed? How did you feel? How might being truly hospitable be challenging? What might hold us back from being genuinely hospitable?
PRAYER Barrier-breaking God, You embrace all cultures and lands, But keep a special place in your heart For the stranger, the widow and the orphan. Grant us the gift of your Spirit That we may become as You are, Welcoming all as brothers and sisters, Your cherished children, Citizens together in Christ’s kingdom of justice and peace. Amen
GO AND DO (see http://www.ctbi.org.uk/goanddo) The Caribbean Council of Churches has been involved in advocacy to challenge those nations that are restricting or stripping Haitians of citizenship rights.
Visit Go and Do to read Milciades story about being denied his rights in the Dominican Republic.
Visit Go and Do to find inspiration and encouragement to keep helping those who have been forced from their homes across the world.

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January 19: Week of Prayer for Christian Unity; Introduction to this year’s theme and background.

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The material for the Week of Prayer for Christian Unity 2018 has been produced in the Caribbean.

There are 1.4 Million Christians living in the Caribbean region, across a vast geographical spread of island and mainland territories. They represent a rich and diverse tapestry of ethnic, linguistic and religious traditions, with a complex variety of governmental and constitutional arrangements.

The contemporary context is deeply marked by the history of colonialism which stripped people of their identity, dignity and freedom. Christian missionary activity, closely tied to the colonial system, seemed to support, encourage and excuse it. During five-hundred years of the colonial system, scripture was used to justify the enslavement of the indigenous people. In a dynamic reversal, those same scriptures became the inspiration and motivation for people to reclaim their liberty. 

Recognising the hand of God in the ending of enslavement, the Caribbean Christians offer Exodus 15, a song of triumph over oppression, as the motif of the Week of Prayer. The hymn, The Right Hand of God, reflecting the song of Miriam and Moses in praise of the liberating action of God, has become the anthem of the ecumenical movement in the region. Like the Israelites, the people of the Caribbean have a song of victory and freedom to sing.

Yet, contemporary challenges continue to enslave and threaten the dignity of the people. Many of the contemporary challenges are the legacy of the colonial past. The Caribbean economies have traditionally been based upon the production of materials for the European market – sometimes producing only a single commodity. They have never been self-sustaining and their development has required borrowing on the international market. The servicing of the debt has caused a reduction in spending upon the development that it was meant to facilitate.

The chosen passage from Exodus 15 allows us to see that the road to unity must often pass through a communal experience of suffering. The Israelites’ liberation from enslavement is the foundational event in the constitution of the people. Although our liberation and salvation is at God’s initiative, human agencies are engaged in their realisation. Christians participate in God’s ministry of reconciliation, yet our divisions hamper our witness to a world in need of God’s healing.

The themes of the daily material raise some of the contemporary issues addressed by the churches of the Caribbean. Abuses of human rights are found across the region and we are challenged to consider our manner of welcoming of the stranger into our midst. Human trafficking and modern-day slavery continue to be huge issues. Addiction to pornography and drugs, continue to be serious challenges to all societies. The debt crisis has a negative impact upon the nations and upon individuals – the economies of the nations and people have become precarious. Family life continues to be challenged by the economic restrictions which lead to migration, domestic abuse and violence.

The Caribbean Churches work together to heal the wounds in the body of Christ. Reconciliation demands repentance, reparation and the healing of memories. The whole Church is called to be both a sign and an active agent of this reconciliation.

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18 January: The Week of Prayer for Church Unity: WELCOME!

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Tree of Life

We invite you to share with us and all the Churches Together in Britain and Ireland the forthcoming week of Prayer for Unity. A Word from the General Secretary today; an introduction to this year’s theme tomorrow, then reflections, readings, prayers for each day of the Octave, or eight day week.

Praying for the unity of the Church involves a recognition not only of the brokenness of Christian relationships but also how injustice in the world at large rends asunder Christian communities and impedes our participation in God’s mission. History too plays a part, casting a shadow over how we live our lives together in community. All of these issues emerge from the Week of Prayer for Christian Unity materials for 2018.

The churches of the Caribbean region describe to us their own context, how the hand of God was active in ending slavery, and how God’s mission in the world is a call to us all to unite together in ending injustice, that which casts a shadow from the past and current forms of injustice such as poverty, trafficking and discrimination. This particular Caribbean experience is a challenge to us in our context to reflect more deeply on the injustices in our own nations in Britain and Ireland which create the divisions that impede our participation in God’s mission, with the call to actively work to end all division.

Within these resources you will find not only the worship service derived from the International material that is resourced by the Caribbean churches, but also additional material written by the CTBI Writers Group. I hope and pray that you will find these materials inspiring as you seek to participate in the life that sets us free to be one in God.

Bob Fyffe,

General Secretary, Churches Together in Britain and Ireland

 

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New Year’s Eve, Father Andrew at Christmas VIII: The Holy Night

nightwarsaw

‘How still that little sleeping town’ – somehow I doubt it tonight! But the homeless One Reveals God’s Face. There will be a welcome at one or other of Canterbury’s Churches each night during the coldest months.

The Holy Night

How still the night,
How still the stars,
How still that little sleeping town,
How like a jewel in God’s crown
That Star of stars
That shines so bright.

How silver sweet
The moon doth shine;
Lo, yonder little cattle-shed
Shall lend a straw-strewn manger bed
To Babe divine
And Mother sweet.

To all our race
The light hath come;
For He Who lies ‘neath quilt of straw,
That homeless One Whom shepherds saw
Himself our Home,
Reveals God’s Face.

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A Carol Service in Canterbury to help Street Children and others.

amos.trust carol service

Some news from Christians Together Canterbury – a network of churches and Christian groups across Canterbury, including L’Arche Kent.

 Amos Trust Carol Service

The Amos Trust is holding a Carol Service in Canterbury on Thursday 7th December at St Peter’s Methodist Church from 7.00 p.m.

Amos Trust is a small, creative human rights organisation, committed to challenging injustice, building hope and creating positive change.  Its three areas of work are among street children in South Africa, Burundi, India and Tanzania; building sustainable rural communities in Nicaragua and India; and working for a just peace for Palestine. Every year Amos Trust holds an excellent Carol Service in London at St James’s Piccadilly.  It is seeking to make this Carol Service more widely available, and is experimenting by ‘exporting’ it to Canterbury this year.

There will be a collection during the service to support the vital work in which the Amos Trust is involved.

amos_trust_canterbury_christmas_A4_poster_2017

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June 23, Shared Table VI: Would You Give Him a Stone?

shared meal

John had a degree in chemistry and a job that used his skills and experience. His employers were sympathetic to the needs of their employees, and tried hard to accommodate John’s mental ill-health but they parted company when he became unable to do his work and was in a mental hospital under a section.

Around this time John visited and told us he blamed his plight on past drug misuse that had permanently affected the way his brain worked.

His face  comes to mind when I am approached by beggars or homeless people: would giving them money be giving bread or a stone? (Matthew 7:9) Another question: would I give my son money in the near-certain knowledge that it would be spent on mind-altering drugs? (Thank God he has more sense.) But at least I can trust ‘Catching Lives’ to use my donations to provide nourishment, support and shelter.

 

 

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Supersister takes to the sky!

Skydive

Sister Clare Knowles is one of our writers – one of the FMSL team, on the extreme right below. The ‘L’ in FMSL stands for Littlehampton, which is close to Worthing, a seaside town where the Christian Churches have come together to tackle homelessness. You can read more about that project here: http://www.wchp.org.uk/

Clare has found a down-to-earth way of raising money for the project: jumping out of a plane (with parachute and mentor attached).

Please sponsor her and help get people in off the streets and fulfilling their potential in life.

Here is the link to make donations: https://mydonate.bt.com/fundraisers/clareknowles1

Thank you for your generous support.

Will Turnstone.

 

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Left to right: Sisters Susan, Esther, Elizabeth, Marcellina, Patricia and Clare FMSL

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On the Road to Jerusalem: Lent in Canterbury.

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From Churches Together in Canterbury.

Dear Friends,
On this sunny (mostly) Shrove Tuesday, I am here in your inboxes to let you know what is going on around Canterbury for Lent. I am bound to have missed something, but here are some things for anyone looking for a way to engage with the season.There’s a mixture of events to attend and online ways to engage.
            1. ‘Conversations on the Journey’ – the Canterbury Diocese Lent Resource
From the Diocese’s website:

In a letter launching the Diocesan theme – Conversations on the Journey – Bishop Trevor wrote, “I sense that there are many transformative, and perhaps risky, conversations yet waiting to happen in our churches. I want us to encourage these in every way that we can.”

40 Days / 40 Voices: Conversations on the Road to Jerusalem

Rather than producing a traditional-style Lent course in 2017 we have produced a daily devotional called 40 Days / 40 Voices. Each day in Lent a different person from the Diocese will offer their response to a part of the biblical story charting Jesus’ journey to Jerusalem from Luke 9:51 all the way to Luke 23:56. The reflections include words, poems, artwork, photography, music. Each day’s response will take the form of a daily email which will include the scripture for the day and the reflection.

Sign up for your daily emails by visiting this site and clicking on the ‘Sign up’ link:
2. Lunchtime Lent Lectures at St Peter’s Anglican Church, Tuesday 12:30pm followed by light lunch
“Faith Expressed through the Arts”
7th March John Shirland ‘The Icon’
14th March Dr Jane Gledhill ‘Literature’
21st March Professor Ken Pickering ‘Drama’
28th March Archdeacon Jo Kelly-Moore ‘The Art of Auckland Cathedral’
4th April Professor Graham Anderson ‘Music’
3. Luther Discussion Groups at the French Church, 7:00-8:30pm on Tuesdays 14th, 21st and 28th March, and 4th April.
Discussions will be based on a brief introduction to Martin Luther’s life and ministry, and will be led by members of the French Church (ability to speak French not necessary).
4. Vineyard Lent Worship Teams
6:00pm at the Vineyard offices (behind Chaucer School) on Sundays 12th, 19th, 26th March and 2nd April.
5. Quiet Day at the Franciscan Study Centre, hosted by All Saints Church, Whitstable
10am-4pm on Saturday 25th March – ending with tea and home-made cake (please bring your own lunch)
Speaker: Rev Canon Tony Marchant
Suggested donation £10
There are only limited places left, so please contact Anne Rees to check availability and book your place.
6. “Stories from the Wilderness” – a Lent podcast series from 24-7 Prayer
The 24-7 Prayer movement and Christian Solidarity Worldwide (CSW) have partnered to produce a series of podcasts for Lent, each featuring the story of someone who has suffered for their faith. Their ‘wilderness’ experiences are shared to help us focus on our own wilderness places, and to prepare for Easter.
For more info and to find out how to download the podcasts visit:
Lyndall Bywater
Moderator, Christians Together in Canterbury

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