Tag Archives: Commandments

7 December: One Good Deed, I.

Welcome back to Sister Johanna with a double posting that fits well with tomorrow’s feast of Mary Immaculate, as the second article makes plain. Great as she is, Mary is one of us; eternal life did not always come easily for her.

Master, what good deed must I do to possess eternal life?

Matthew 19:16–22

This is the question asked of Jesus by the one who is forever described but never named: the rich young man. I know this story well. I can’t begin it without a little sinking feeling in my soul because I know how it will end. I have come to call the person who asks this question ‘the poor rich young man,’ poor in the sense of deeply unfortunate. He walks away from Jesus. What could possibly be more tragic? But let’s not get ahead of the story. Lectio divina is a practice of reading bible passages slowly, even the ones I know well, in order to give the Holy Spirit time to lead me into a new understanding of God’s life in me.

So, what happened this time when I read? Well, in the very first line, I was taken aback by the fact that this young man asks Jesus about a ‘good deed’ – in the singular. I must have been in a feisty mood this morning, for I felt that had I been there with Jesus and that young man, I’d have been tempted to toss my head disdainfully and, hands on hips, invite this well-dressed specimen of human affluence to tell me why or how he could possibly imagine that only one good deed would suffice to attain heaven? But, had I done so, I would not have been a help to Jesus. His ways are not my ways.

And his way is almost always a puzzling one. Jesus says to him,

Why ask me what is good? There is one alone who is good. But if you wish to enter into life, keep the commandments.’

This time, as I puzzled over Jesus’ words once again, I asked the Lord in prayer why he had said, ‘Why ask me what is good?’ It seemed so dismissive. And something immediately occurred to me: perhaps I was putting the accent on the wrong word and misunderstanding the question. The point Jesus is trying to make, maybe, is not ‘Why ask me what is good?’ but ‘Why ask me what is good.’ Jesus might be trying to remind the young man that the one who alone is good, the Father, has already made it perfectly clear what we need to do in order to attain eternal life. Keep the commandments. There is no mystery here, and no need to ask the question. The answer has been there since the beginning of the covenant. “Why ask at all?” Jesus seems to be saying to the young man.

The young man seems to understand Jesus, and to Jesus’ remark, ‘Keep the commandments,’ replies, perhaps with some defensiveness, ‘Which ones?’ And immediately, I’m on my high horse again. I am tempted to toss my head and snort, “Oh, come on! Don’t be such a goon. All of them! There are only ten, after all! Or maybe you’re hoping that Jesus will give you a bargain, reduce the price, give you heaven for, maybe, five of the commandments rather than all ten. Your preoccupation with expense is exposed here. For you, this is all about reducing the cost, isn’t it? If you can buy heaven for less than ten commandments, you’ll consider it.” And it could be that these uncharitable thoughts of mine have some truth in them. But, again, Jesus does not handle the matter my way at all.

I would like to pause here for today and climb down off my high horse. Tomorrow, perhaps in a kinder mood, I’ll resume my reflection.

Leave a comment

Filed under Daily Reflections, Mission

6 November, Heart IX: Come on Priory!

This reading from Numbers seems appropriate for All Saints’ Tide; the picture too.

The Priory school football team from 1948, dressed as a team to play as a team, and not go astray after divers things. I remember hearing a British competitor from the London Olympics of that year telling how she was sent a white cotton running vest and enough red and blue ribbon to sew the stripes onto it for herself. in 1948, of course, sport was not highly paid, players were expected to follow their sport’s precepts on the field and be good examples off it. Wear your School strip or national running vest with pride, and reflect upon what it means.

The blue ribands seem to have found their way onto the Israeli flag.

The Lord said to Moses: Speak to the children of Israel, and thou shalt tell them to make to themselves fringes in the corners of their garments, putting in them ribands of blue: that when they shall see them, they may remember all the commandments of the Lord, and not follow their own thoughts and eyes going astray after divers things, but rather being mindful of the precepts of the Lord, may do them and be holy to their God.

I am the Lord your God, who brought you out of the land of Egypt, that I might be your God.

Leave a comment

Filed under Daily Reflections, Mission

15 August: Serve him with a perfect heart

 And [God] said to me: Solomon thy son shall build my house, and my courts: for I have chosen him to be my son, and I will be a father to him. And I will establish his kingdom for ever, if he continue to keep my commandments, and my judgments, as at this day. Now then before all the assembly of Israel, in the hearing of our God, keep ye, and seek all the commandments of the Lord our God: that you may possess the good land, and may leave it to your children after you for ever. And thou my son Solomon, know the God of thy father, and serve him with a perfect heart, and a willing mind: for the Lord searcheth all hearts, and understandeth all the thoughts of minds. If thou seek him, thou shalt find him: but if thou forsake him, he will cast thee off for ever.

Now therefore seeing the Lord hath chosen thee to build the house of the sanctuary, take courage, and do it.

1 Chronicles 28:6-10

Try substituting ‘Mary’ or ‘daughter’ for ‘Solomon’ or ‘son’. No question of her being ‘cast off for ever.’ Rather she was enfolded in the Lord’s arms at the end.

Image from Assisi, MMB.

Leave a comment

Filed under Daily Reflections, Mission

July 2, Going Viral XLI: Rev Jo’s perspective on Pope Francis’s perspective.

Pope Francis receives a blessing from Archbishop of Canterbury, Justin Welby.

Recently Rev Jo Richards directed us to Pope Francis’s contribution to the BBC Rethink programme. What can we do differently after the lock-down?

She recommends part of Pope Francis’ reflections which is well worth a read. ‘In this he reflects upon the homeless, and one profound comment he makes is:We need to tell ourselves this often: the poor person had a mother who raised him lovingly. When I caught up with some of the rough sleepers a couple of weeks ago, they said the one thing they are looking forward to is to give their mum a hug. As Pope Francis says, this has been an opportunity for us all to rethink. Powerful stuff! As we are reminded, by the words of Christ: 

‘Matthew 22: 36-40: Master, which is the great commandment in the law? Jesus said unto him, Thou shalt love the Lord thy God with all thy heart, and with all thy soul, and with all thy mind. This is the first and great commandment. …

 ‘God Bless you all, and please do keep well, keep connected and keep praying.

‘Jo🙏🙏🙏’

Rev Jo Richards Rector of the Benefice of St Dunstan, St Mildred and St Peter, Canterbury.

Leave a comment

Filed under Christian Unity, corona virus, Daily Reflections, Mission

3 June: Heart III: Hear, O Israel!

Image from CD.

Hear, O Israel, the Lord our God is one Lord. Thou shalt love the Lord thy God with thy whole heart, and with thy whole soul, and with thy whole strength. And these words which I command thee this day, shall be in thy heart: thou shalt tell them to thy children, and thou shalt meditate upon them sitting in thy house, and walking on thy journey, sleeping and rising.

Deuteronomy 6:4ff.

This passage is still proclaimed by Jewish people in worship, and the Christian church too, brings it into her night prayer, week by week. And we will recognise the ‘greatest commandment of the Law’ that jesus discussed with the lawyer, buut it’s no good being able to recite Scripture ‘by heart’ if God’s word is not deep in our heart.

We begin to see how Scripture calls us to be generous and total in our love of God and each other. Sometimes that call will be a trumpet blast, at others a still small voice. But what sort of God is it that we are called to love? He is not an absentee Creator, but one who continues to form us in love.

Leave a comment

Filed under Daily Reflections

19 February. What is Theology saying, XLV: moral law draws believers into relationship

Other than in instances of dogmatically defined doctrine, the individual conscience holds sway.

_________________________________

Like all Christians, Catholics see the Ten Commandments found in the Hebrew Scriptures as the basic groundwork for moral action, which together with the life of Jesus provide a deep and abiding understanding for how to act with love and justice in the world. The Gospel of Matthew relates that upon being asked which commandment was most important, Jesus replied that all of the law is contained in the commandments to love God and love your neighbour (Matthew 22:36-40).

Catholics see this as going beyond the injunctions of moral law by drawing believers into a relationship with others as well as with God, and it is the foundation of the Church’s teaching on issues of social justice.

leo XIII

Leo XIII

From the earliest days of the Church, Catholics have performed works of mercy to help those who most need it, but the Church’s current involvement in social justice issues really took form in 1891 with the promulgation of the papal encyclical Rerum Novarum. In it, Pope Leo XIII called for workers to be treated with dignity and respect, protected by the state from exploitation, and allowed to form unions.

It touched off a flowering of social encyclicals that have become central to the Church’s work in the world. Catholic social teaching focuses on the dignity of the person as the linchpin for all discussions of ethics, politics, and justice. It is central to Catholic calls for the fair treatment of workers, for political systems that recognize individual rights, for responsible scientific research, for an end to attacks on human life in the form of abortion and the death penalty, and many other teachings as well.

AMcC

Leave a comment

Filed under Daily Reflections

November 27. What is Theology saying, XLII: the Ten Commandments – there are only two commandments

We have Gospel accounts of what Jesus gave. Everything is summed up by loving God with all your heart and mind, and your neighbour as God loves you. Christian morality consists of the love of God and the recognition of each other as children of the same Father. Augustine said teach the Ten Commandments, and then added – there are only two commandments! He evidently could not just teach the last piece of advice on its own, without first giving instruction on the Ten Commandments. So, is there any difference between Jewish and Christian moral teaching? Some have said the Jews follow the letter, Christians follow the spirit. Nothing could be more false; there is no difference of this kind between the two. Jesus did not teach a moral theology. He accepted the Jewish Law – he obeyed everything, including ritual laws, unless there was conflict with what the Father was asking of him in his vocation.

He tried to offer the insight by which living according to God’s law is simple – to be worried about regulations rather than whole-hearted service was far from the will of God. Jesus’ basic moral demands: repentance, faith and discipleship. There is no New Testament code of morality; Christian ethic is open to the future, to new demands in new situations.

We need codes of behaviour as support and guidelines, but we also need to be alert to the invitation of God hidden in everyday circumstances. No code can predict the possibility of Grace and salvation, the opportunities for loving response to anyone at any time. There is only one occasion when Jesus says there is a New Commandment – that we love one another as he loves us.

AMcC

Veronica Geurin lived and died for the truth, not to obey regulations.

Leave a comment

Filed under Daily Reflections

June 18: So Who is my Neighbour?

warsaweve1-800x457

We know that Jesus and the Jewish religious leaders agreed that there were two great commandments, to Love God and to love your neighbour.

Jesus told a story to answer the question, Who is my neighbour? (Luke 10: 35ff) but he was, at root, giving the same answer as the Book of Deuteronomy, according to this article in Bible History Today by Richard Elliott Friedman: follow the link Love your neighbour .

Thoroughly worth reading!

Will.

 

 

 

 

Leave a comment

Filed under Daily Reflections

Tuesday 9th February, 2016: The Divine Law of Love

 

LAW

 

1st Reading:  1 Kings 8:22-23, 27-30

Psalm: 83:3-5, 10-11, R. v2

Gospel:  Mark 7:1-13

 

Jesus says in the Gospel “You put aside the commandments of God to cling to human traditions”.  How true it is in our world today, where there is so much red tape, which makes life more complicated instead of simpler. Human ways of doing things take precedence over God’s commandments. Every issue is settled in the law court. Matters that should have been settled traditionally within the Christian community are also carried to the law court. I ask: how far has the law court helped us to solve our problems, when most often the Just Judge himself was not invoked?  Does God have a position in our present world?  This is time for us to go back to our roots.  God alone is the foundation stone upon which we must stand.  Human traditions and laws, however good, can never give us the true happiness and peace we crave.

Jesus challenges us to reclaim his Father’s commandments so that all will be well again for us.  All of God’s commandments are imbedded in two- love of God and love of neighbour.  We love God by being forgiving, kind, holy, just, and merciful as God himself. As Scripture says, we cannot say we love God whom we do not see when we do not love our neighbour whom we can see. If we are able truly to love one another as God asks us, our world will be a better place where we shall be brothers and sisters to each other.  May we make a conscious effort every day to love as God loves – unconditionally.

FMSL

Leave a comment

Filed under Daily Reflections