Tag Archives: communion

New Year’s Day: fellow travellers.

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A prayer from USPG.

Help us Lord, to remember at the beginning of this year, that you will journey with us in all we do. Thank you for others whom you send to travel with us. Bless us all with your wisdom and love.

This is the first of three posts from USPG to start the year with reflection and prayer. May your journey be peaceful when you walk alone with God, joyful when you walk with others, and full of discovery of God’s goodness to you and through you.

 

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December 4: Thomas Traherne XV: You are God’s joy.

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Church-going Christians are used to being called to rejoice in the Lord, but here Traherne suggests that we are God’s joy. As if God had emotions! But whatever we say about God  is a very approximate attempt to grapple with a reality we cannot grasp. Remember that Genesis tells us that he saw everything that he had made, and indeed it was very good. So good that he came to earth to experience it all.

Were you not born to have communion with Him? And that cannot be without this heavenly union. Which when it is what it ought is Divine and Infinite.

You are God’s joy for willing what He willeth. He loves to see you good and blessed. And will not you love to see Him good?

Verily, if ever you would enjoy God, you must enjoy His goodness: All His goodness to all His hosts in Heaven and Earth. And when you do so, you are the universal heir of God and all things.

God is yours and the whole world. You are His, and you are all; or in all, and with all.

Photo: MMB, Plowden Church, Shropshire.

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December 3, Thomas Traherne XIV: Jesus Christ is an infinite treasure.

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Traherne tells us today that unless we will the redemption of mankind, Jesus will be no treasure to us. What would I have to change, where would I have to grow, to truly will the redemption of mankind – including X, Y, and Z ? (insert hate figures to taste.)

[God] willed the redemption of mankind, and therefore is His Son Jesus Christ an infinite treasure. Unless you will it too, He will be no treasure to you.

Verily you ought to will these things so ardently that God Himself should be therefore your joy because He willed them. Your will ought to be united to His in all places of His dominion.

Were you not born to have communion with Him? And that cannot be without this heavenly union. Which when it is what it ought is Divine and Infinite.

Traherne, First Century of Meditation

Photographs: MMB, CD.

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October 30: Traherne XIII: Extend your Will like His.

Let’s return to the good Thomas Traherne. This is from Century I:53. Challenging ideas, that God willed Creation in order to let himself have fuller being in his Son, and that we are called to extend our good will to all people and all Creation; to will their happiness into being. Laudato Si!

God  willed the Creation not only that He might Appear but Be: wherein is seated the mystery of the Eternal Generation of His Son. Do you will it as He did, and you shall be glorious as He. He willed the happiness of men and angels not only that He might appear, but be good and wise and glorious.

And He willed it with such infinite desire, that He is infinitely good: infinitely good in Himself,and infinitely blessed in them. Do you will the happiness of men and angels as He did, and you shall be good, and infinitely blessed as He is. All their happiness shall be your happiness as it is His. He willed the glory of all ages, and the government and welfare of all Kingdoms, and the felicity also of the highest cherubims.

Do you extend your Will like Him and you shall be great as He is, and concerned and happy in all these. He willed the redemption of mankind, and therefore is His Son Jesus Christ an infinite treasure. Unless you will it too, He will be no treasure to you. Verily you ought to will these things so ardently that God Himself should be therefore your joy because He willed them. Your will ought to be united to His in all places of His dominion. Were you not born to have communion with Him? And that cannot be without this heavenly union. Which when it is what it ought is Divine and Infinite.

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July 3, Readings from Mary Webb, II: Unless latent loves are developed …

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We listen, hearing a faint call from afar. It is this sense of mystery – unfading, because the veil is never lifted – that gives glory to the countryside, tenderness to atmosphere. It is this that sends one man to the wilds, another to dig a garden; that sings in a musician’s brain; that inspires the pagan to build an altar and the child to make a cowslip-ball. For in each of us is implanted the triune capacity for loving his fellow and nature and the Creator of them.

These loves may be latent, but they are there; and unless they are all developed we cannot reach perfect manhood or womanhood. For the complete character is that which is in communion with most sides of life – which sees, hears, and feels most – which has for its fellows the sympathy of understanding, for nature the love that is without entire comprehension, and for the mystery beyond them the inexhaustible desire which surely prophesies fulfilment somewhere.

We would not encourage a child to make a cowslip ball today, though there seemed to be an abundance along the motorways this Spring, but that’s not a place to set a child gathering flowers!

Interesting how Mary Webb sees a complete human as having a triune nature, being ‘in communion with most sides of life’, not denying illness, frailty or failing. Let us not exclude the unfading sense of mystery, but be open to our sisters and brothers, our fellow creatures and the One who created all.

 

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May 28th Personhood VI

 

Yesterday, we ended with Henri de Lubac’s idea that in the Person of the Son, we are “completed” as persons.  What can he possibly mean by this?  Jesus himself answers the question in the Gospel of St. John by teaching us about the indwelling of the Father, Son and Holy Spirit in our hearts:

I shall ask the Father and he will give you another Paraclete to be with you for ever, the Spirit of truth whom the world can never accept since it neither sees nor knows him; but you know him because he is with you, he is in you.  I shall not leave you orphans; I shall come to you….  On that day you will know that I am in my Father and you in me and I in you.   Whoever loves me will be loved by my Father and I shall love him and reveal myself to him.  Anyone who loves me will keep my word, and my Father will love him and we shall come to him and make a home in him.

John 14:16ff

 

Our ‘completion’ as persons is realised only through our share in the very life of the Trinity.  In the Trinity, the divine persons freely give themselves to one another in love.  They do not become the other, but in an eternal dance of love, they ceaselessly give themselves to one another.  To share in this ‘dance’ is to become a person in the deepest sense of the word.  And we can do this through Christ; he, and only he, makes possible for us an interior life shared with himself, the Father and the Holy Spirit.  He gives us a share in his own rich and joyful interior life, a share in his very fullness of being.  ‘I have told you this so that my own joy may be in you and your joy be complete.’  This is the true – the truest – realisation of our personhood and our human dignity.  This overflows into all our relationships.  God has created us with a need to be in communion with others.  Henri de Lubac’s words are enlightening:

‘God did not create the world apart from himself, nor did he create souls apart from one another.  In the first place, does not each one need “the other” so as to be awakened into conscious life?  Again, does not to be a person [mean] to enter upon a relationship with others?  The summons to personal life is a vocation.’

SJC

 

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April 19, Jerusalem III: The Temple and Sacrifice

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A few years ago a romantic young Jerusalem rabbi explained on television how he would restore the sacrificial ritual of the Temple, once his organisation had taken charge of the site, an event he was confident would occur soon. He was convinced that this was what God wanted.

Scripture seems far less certain about Temple sacrifice; there are plenty of passages like this one:

You who wanted no sacrifice or oblation,

opened my ear;

you asked no holocaust or sacrifice for sin,

then I said, ‘Here I am! I am coming!’ (Psalm 40:6–7)

 

Yet the sacrificial dissection, burning and eating of animals by priest and people went on, day after day, year after year. Why? Mary Douglas suggested that sacrifice was a concrete form of telling the story of the Lord’s presence at the heart of the Temple and of his people. The body of the sacrificial animal ‘corresponding to the tabernacle in the holy nation’,[1] and its life and that of the people were  symbolically returned to God through the blood and vital parts offered at the altar, while the meat shared by priests and offerers expressed communion with God and each other.

The young rabbi’s plan is on hold for the foreseeable future. God wants neither elaborate ritual nor the innermost parts of animals; he wants faith (Hebrews 11); he wants the innermost parts of his servants to ascend to him in a living sacrifice (Romans 12:1).

We do not need to be in Jerusalem to make a morning offering!

MMB.

[1]    Mary Douglas: ‘Leviticus as Literature’, Oxford University Press, 1999; p 134.

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