Tag Archives: health

21 August: come a few degrees Southwards

Anachronistic by more than 60 years! The penny post was not established until 1840.

It’s holiday season, and was so in August 1780. Johnson writes to invite a Scottish friend to come and enjoy the bright lights of London, but a little later perhaps, when winter is drawing in.

To DR. BEATTIE, AT ABERDEEN.

Sir,

More years than I have any delight to reckon, have past since you and I saw one another; of this, however, there is no reason for making any reprehensory complaint—Sic fata ferunt*. But methinks there might pass some small interchange of regard between us.

If you say, that I ought to have written, I now write; and I write to tell you, that I have much kindness for you and Mrs. Beattie; and that I wish your health better, and your life long. Try change of air, and come a few degrees Southwards: a softer climate may do you both good; winter is coming on; and London will be warmer, and gayer, and busier, and more fertile of amusement than Aberdeen.

More news I have not to tell you, and therefore you must be contented with hearing, what I know not whether you much wish to hear, that I am, Sir,

Your most humble servant,
SAM. JOHNSON.

August 21, 1780.

Life of Johnson, Volume 3 1776-1780 by James Boswell.

* That’s how the fates worked out.

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2 August: A Ugandan ‘thank you’ to Pope Francis for creating the catechist ministry

Oola Bosco, a catechist, teaches at the Palabek Refugee Settlement March 2021 in Uganda. Many of the refugees at the settlement are from South Sudan. (Courtesy of Lazar Arasu)

 

A Ugandan ‘thank you’ to Pope Francis for creating the catechist ministry by Lazar Arasu from National Catholic Reporter, June 30. A taste of the article follows; the whole piece can be found at this link.

Moses Kiggwa is a dedicated catechist in Kamuli parish within Jinja Diocese, which is about 70 miles east of our capital of Kampala. Besides training as a primary teacher, he also trained himself as a catechist.

“I find joy in being a catechist more than anything else,” Moses told me recently. He eventually gave up his teaching career to be a full-time evangelizer. He noted with pride that he has helped to found several sub-parishes in the remote areas of his parish, along the Nile River.

Now in his late 50s, he is still committed to educating people to faith. Riding his bicycle for several years in his evangelization efforts has created serious health problems, but he is only happy that he has sustained the faith of several hundreds of people.

Surely there are lessons for the rest of the Church from the long-standing ministry of catechists in countries like Uganda?

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10 July: Going viral LXXXIII, PPE and bad science.

Mrs Turnstone was talking about a neighbour who cannot visit elderly friends because her partner refuses to take the Covid-19 vaccine in any form, yet they are the products of good science and hygienic manufacturing.

The picture above shows a 17th Century plague doctor in full PPE (Personal Protective Equipment). It was not realised that the black rats around his feet were beset with fleas which passed the plague onto humans. The Doctor was well protected against airborne diseases, not against fleas. Note the poppies at hand to prepare opiate drugs, still very much in use today.

Another disease that was thought to come from bad air was the ague, a Northern European strain of mal – aria, that is bad – air. 150 years after the plague doctor appeared in Canterbury (you can see him on the mural in the subway by St George’s and the bus station), WIlliam Hutton wrote An History of Birmingham (1783). He attributed the absence of ague to the air of Birmingham, which stands on red sandstone, a free-draining rock. Hutton wrote:

Thus eminently situated, the sun can exercise his full powers of exhalation. The foundation upon which this mistress of the arts is erected, is one solid mass of dry reddish sand. The vapours that rise from the earth are the great promoters of disease; but here, instead of the moisture ascending to the prejudice of the inhabitant, the contrary is evident; for the water descends through the pores of the sand, so that even our very cellars are habitable. This accounts for the almost total extinction of the ague among us:–During a residence of thirty years, I have never seen one person afflicted with it, though, by the opportunities of office, I have frequently visited the repositories of the sick.

Thus peculiarly favoured, this happy spot, enjoys four of the greatest benefits that can attend human existence–water, air, the sun, and a situation free from damps.

Like tropical malaria, the ague depends on mosquitoes to spread among humans. Mosquitoes need still water to breathe, perhaps especially drainage ditches and ponds, less and less common in what was becoming a major built up area. And there was plenty of pollution in the air from factories great and small burning coal, but still Hutton was jumping to conclusions.

. . . . .

We have much to be grateful for. Thirteen years after Hutton’s history, Edward Jenner gave the first cowpox vaccination, which would eventually lead to the abolition of smallpox, and inspired so much progress in public health. Now to get at the covid virus around the world!

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31 May, Going Viral LXXVIII: with homeless people in Canterbury

CATCHING LIVES WINTER PROVISION

REPORT 2020/2021

Catching Lives is the agency that looks out for homeless people in Canterbury. One of their projects is to provide winter shelter and support for those living on the streets. It has been clear this winter that some choose not to come in from the cold, but for those that do so, some impressive help has been given. This is the report on their work this winter.

INTRODUCTION


During the winter of 2020/21 Catching Lives worked alongside other agencies, such as Canterbury City Council to offer a form of emergency accommodation under Winter Provision to as many rough sleepers as possible, giving opportunities to work with such individuals to try and find more permanent housing options for those who wanted it. The Covid-19 pandemic meant that this winter we were unable to operate our usual Canterbury Community Shelter, as clients staying would have been sleeping in a church hall, sharing the airspace, and therefore at risk of catching and spreading the covid-19 virus.

We explained to Canterbury City Council at an early stage that we would not have the funds to secure a venue at which all those staying would have their own rooms.The outcome was that Canterbury City Council were able to negotiate a licence to occupy all the rooms at the Youth Hostels Association (YHA) building on New Dover Road from 14th
December 2020 to 27th February 2021, meaning that 17 rooms were available for rough sleepers to occupy. This included their own shower and toilet facilities so they did not have to share with anyone else.

Assessments for rooms were carried out by Catching Lives Project Workers at the Canterbury Open Day Centre on Station Road East. Those allocated a room were able to keep it until they either found other suitable accommodation to move into, or had to leave due to serious behavioural issues that would have put the safety of others at risk. The YHA was staffed by two catching Lives Project Workers in the evening, who welcomed the clients in and provided them with evening meals prepared by Catching Lives volunteers earlier in the day. Two staff members were on duty overnight (one Catching Lives Project Worker and one Serveco staff member). As with previous winters, the funding for the Catching Lives staff members came from usual sources, namely generous donations from Charitable Trusts and individuals within our community.

Those staying in the YHA could access from 5pm and had to leave at 8am the following morning. They were provided breakfast and lunch, and access to other facilities such as phone, computer and washing machine use, at the Day Centre every day of the week. Art and activity packs were put together by Catching Lives’ Art Coordinator Miriam Ellis, with the support of local artists, for those staying to do in their rooms. Catching Lives Project Workers, and Outreach
Workers operating under Canterbury City Councils’ Rough Sleeper Initiative, provided ongoing support to help clients take steps towards finding housing.

This included, but is by no means limited to, help registering with a GP, referrals to mental health services, looking for work, applying for benefits, referrals for supported accommodation and signposting to the adult drug and alcohol support service run by Forward Trust.

As well as the rooms available at the YHA, Canterbury City Council also offered people temporary placement in a variety of B&Bs, hotels and shared houses (both in and outside of Canterbury). The decision whether to offer one of these locations instead of a room at the YHA involved several factors such as their level of support needs, including physical and mental health considerations. Those placed out of area were supported by the outreach workers, including two taken on by Catching Lives on a temporary contract funded by the MHCLG Winter Transformation Fund.

As always we would like to thank our local community for supporting us by donating items such as money, food and clothing, and also to those who organised fundraising events for us. We’d also like to thank all our volunteers, such as those who prepare meals for clients at the centre, and our bookshop volunteers who bring in a substantial income whilst also spreading much needed awareness of our work, for their valuable donation of their time. This is especially the case over the last year as we are aware that many of our supporters have been effected by the pandemic themselves yet have still been able to show us such tremendous support. Thank you also to all staff at the Youth Hostels Association for use of their building, and for their cooperation in making this particular part of the local winter provision possible.
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Catching Lives staff

Terry Gore – General Manager
Maria Summerson- Catching Lives Winter Provision Coordinator
Graeme Solly – Project Leader
Charlotte Hill- YHA Project Worker
Davinia Downey- YHA Project Worker
Gill Key- YHA Project Worker
Iwona Waligora – YHA Project Worker
Niki Reynolds- YHA Project Worker
Richard Hopker – YHA Project Worker
Zo Defferay- YHA Project Worker
Emma McCrudden – Outreach Worker
Megan Johnson- Outreach Worker
Paul Wardell- Outreach Worker
Dorota Witczak – Project Worker
Paul Todd – Project Worker/ YHA on call
Stephanie Hagen- Mentoring Coordinator/ Project Worker
James Duff- YHA on call/ Trustee/ volunteer
Miriam Ellis – Arts Coordinator
Karen Baxter – Mental Health Outreach
Denis Tweedie – Mental Health Outreach
Luana Ali – Client Data Coordinator
Simon Rice- Volunteer Coordinator
Paul Willoughby – Administrator
Michael James- Fundraiser

Comparison statistics
During winter provision:
27 different people stayed in the YHA for at least one night, with an average of 7 staying per night.
14 people in B&Bs were supported by Catching Lives

Why were people homeless?
Relationship breakdown 9
Loss of work/ moved for work 6
Eviction- Antisocial behaviour 10
Sale of family home 1
Issues with other tenants 3

Feeling domestic abuse 3

Eviction- could afford rent 2
Release from prison 4
Discharge from hospital 1
Passed tenancy to relative 1
Unsure 1


ACCOMMODATION OUTCOMES (as of 20/03/2021)
YHA
3 moved into private rented accommodation
2 moved into Porchlight supported accommodation
2 placed in further Winter Provision temporary accommodation by Canterbury City Council in Canterbury
7 placed in further Winter Provision temporary accommodation by Canterbury City Council outside of Canterbury
1 refused further temporary accommodation due to it being out of area and returned to rough sleeping
1 refused temporary accommodation due to it being out of area and currently sofa surfing
4 rough sleeping. Unable to contact to offer accommodation
1 sofa surfing. No offer of temporary accommodation made
5 unknown. Loss of contact.
1 in prison or custody
B&Bs
3 moved into private rented accommodation
7 remain in winter provision outside of Canterbury
4 currently sofa surfing

All clients in the B&Bs were registered with a GP; this may be because more of the clients staying in the YHA were newly arrived foreign nationals who had yet to make contact with local health services.

ANALYSIS AND RECOMMENDATIONS
In contrast to the conditions at the rolling night shelter, clients at the YHA had their own room, including their own bed; shower; and toilet. There were several positive outcomes of this, which are summarised below.
In the rolling night shelter there have been issues with clients snoring; clients have informed us that they do not want to access the rolling night shelter because their sleep is disturbed by others snoring, or making other noises during the night. Conversely, some clients have chosen not to stay at the night shelter as they themselves snore and have experienced hostility from others as a result of this. The benefit of better sleep extends beyond the night-time and reaches into other aspects of clients’ lives. Crucially, better rested and safer feeling clients are better able to access support in the Day Centre. Further, some clients are working, or seeking work, and find the conditions in the rolling night shelter unconducive to securing, or maintaining, an employment position.

The sex aspects of homelessness wherein more males than females present as rough sleepers, means that the number of female clients accessing previous rolling night shelter provision has been consistently small. On occasion, the rolling night shelter provision has seen one female sleeping in a communal area with up to nineteen male clients. Thus, for females, the communal nature of the rolling night shelter has constituted a very real barrier to their accessing the provision. One female client who had terminated her place at the rolling night shelter the year before, as the communal arrangements had escalated her anxiety to an intolerable degree, told us, “I’d rather sleep in my car”. For her, the YHA provided a safe and accessible space, in which her only objection was the lack of a TV in the private rooms, as this would have provided something for clients to occupy themselves with in the evening. The importance of developing sensitive policy responses to women’s homelessness has become a central theme in the recent research literature on homelessness, therefore these aspects of accessibility in relation to the rolling night shelter deserve further consideration.

In addition to these factors, clients often present with a history of complex childhood abuse and trauma and therefore, may feel disinclined to share a small space with other rough sleepers. Both clients and staff felt that the conditions in the YHA were more dignified than with the rolling night shelter. Staff observed that for many clients, this may be the first time in a long period that they had slept in their own private room: the YHA “was ten times more dignified than clients sleeping on a cramped floor, often within a foot’s reach of each other.” One Project Worker observed that the pandemic meant that socialising with the clients was reduced and it was “a lonely experience” for both clients – who are the main concern – and also for Project Workers. Another commented that it would have worked better if the overnight workers could have begun earlier, at 9pm, for instance, so that they could spend time with the residents, getting to know them, “making them a last drink or something to eat. You don’t see anyone until the morning when it’s all rushed and you’re rushing them through the door”. This arrangement, “would benefit clients as it would give them extra human beings to talk to”.


Other key Points are:
The task of managing and resolving conflict was enhanced as people had their own private spaces to withdraw to in the event of disagreements, or arguments.
Having a centralised location meant that bedding did not need to be transported daily therefore this aspect of the night shelter provision was less labour intensive than is usually the case.
We must continue to ensure all rough-sleepers are fully aware of the winter shelter and how it operates to hopefully allieviate any concerns some may have about accessing it.
To ensure ongoing training in how to de-escalate conflict is provided for Project Workers and staff from outside agencies who are to be involved in facilitating the night shelter, to make sure all boundaries all clear and maintained consistently.
If winter provision is carried out as a partnership in future years it is vital that all services are aware of how the referral procedure, and access arrangements work, including Out of Hours Canterbury City Council, so that communication is swift and clear.
Some staff at Catching Lives reported difficulties in communication with Canterbury City Council: “the council were frequently unresponsive to emails or phone calls, and generally did not respond in a timely way. When this happened, it impacted on our ability to provide the highest level of support for our clients.”
For Project Workers to be provided with a synopsis of each client – their current circumstance, history, if known, and particular needs – in particular, for those working on the overnight shift.

Catching Lives are incredibly grateful to the Churches who have demonstrated huge generosity in providing use of their halls during previous winter night shelters, and also the volunteers who have supported people by providing activities and food preparation. The experience from both our own perspective and also our clients’ is that the model in which
they have their own self-contained rooms is beneficial for clients in the ways that we have discussed. An ideal scenario going forward would be to continue involving the community, providing volunteering opportunities where we can, as the support of our community is vital for us to be able to keep doing what we do, but to also secure an arrangement whereby it is possible for clients to be able to access their own room or space, which would be a better model for allowing a greater number of people to access the shelter, with or without a pandemic. We are keen to have discussions with the churches who have supported us in the past, and also Canterbury City Council in order to find a model for the coming winter that best meets the needs of our clients.

Feedback from clients


When clients were asked for feedback about what could have been better with the provision, one central theme emerged. This is that the YHA could have been opened in the day for clients to use, “it was pukka, but the only thing was that they kicked you out between 7-8am and you couldn’t go back until 5pm”. This same client pointed out that if a
client presented with a temperature, they would be barred from accessing the provision due to the pandemic, but that “you’re [clients are] more likely to catch a cold outside in cold and freezing temperatures”.
Other comments echoed this: “I wish it was open longer”. Given that places such as cafes, and the library had to remain closed, in very cold weather of snow and ice clients struggled to find dry places to sit down whilst waiting to return to the YHA in the evening. For clients who were self-sufficient with an income, the situation was slightly more manageable. For one weekend clients were able to stay at the YHA during the day, and we would like to express gratitude that the Council and the YHA enabled this. Moving forward, we would like to extend this arrangement across the entire period within which the night shelter operates.

Generally, feedback from clients about the YHA was positive, with comments such as “it was better than what he had before”; and “it was very good”. A few clients expressed appreciation that their views on the provision were being sought. Other feedback includes, “staff were helpful”; and “it was good that it gave me structure to my day”.

Feedback from Project Workers


A couple of Project Workers highlighted the importance of clear and consistent communication from the outset, from both Catching Lives and Canterbury City Council. Generally, feedback was positive, with one Project Worker commenting that the night shelter, “was brilliantly run by Catching Lives” and that staff at the day centre were
“knowledgeable about almost everything I needed to know for the job”. The benefits of positive teamwork amongst the Project Workers were also highlighted with one worker stating that, “I think we pulled together well when we needed to […] covering sickness, etc.!”


Case study of a client’s experience of winter provision


-written by Megan Johnson, Project Worker supporting clients in B&B’s

Usually during the winter months churches open their doors and provide overnight shelter for people with no home to go to. The need for social distancing during the pandemic means this has not been a viable option this winter. The government issued funding to enable local authorities to address this and provide emergency winter provision.
Canterbury City Council has done so by accommodating people in hostels, B&Bs and studio flats. In some cases people could stay only overnight , in others, they could stay 24/7. For those provided with a room available day and night, they have had a time of relative security and stability, this has laid the ground for people to cope better with the challenges they face, engage consistently with our support and potentially change their situation of homelessness. Thanks to additional government COVID19 funding Catching Lives has been able to temporarily employ additional staff and spend more one-on-one time building relationships and supporting clients to progress with their recovery.

One notable example of this is a woman who lost her cleaning job due to COVID19, with the stress of being unable to pay her rent and the rampant fear during the height of the pandemic, she experienced a mental health breakdown. English not being her first language she didn’t know who she could reach out to or what statutory support was available and she ended up sleeping on the streets for several months. Canterbury City Council accommodated her in a B&B and Catching Lives have been working with her for several months now. We have been able to support her to make a successful application for the Right to Remain in the UK, a new requirement due to Brexit. Not only did this mean she could access public funds, it was a huge relief for her to know that she will be able to stay in the UK where her grown up children are living.
We accompanied and supported her for an assessment with her Mental Health Social Worker and they found that her mental health had improved significantly since the previous summer when she had been hospitalised several times. They agreed she was fit to work and so we supported her to prepare a CV and start applying for jobs, which she was
able to do from her accommodation using her mobile and the wifi of the B&B. We began searching for private rented accommodation, she wanted to stay in Canterbury where she has lived for the last seven years. During our house search a potential landlord who couldn’t offer a room but was highly empathetic to her situation gave us a lead on a
cleaning job. We contacted their recommendation and she was offered work to start once she was living back in Canterbury. Within a week we had found a room in a shared house where she felt safe and welcome. We successfully applied for a grant from the Vicar’s Relief Fund to help her pay her deposit and first months’ rent. Though happy to offer a room, the new landlord wanted ideally to see a contract of employment first. We hurriedly arranged a trial shift at the cleaning company and provided transport to and from her first day in her new job. She worked hard and successfully secured a contract which we were able to show to the landlord and we helped her move in to her new home a few days later.
Things are slowly getting back on track and for the first time in a long time, she is starting to think about the future and building the life she hopes for. We have been supporting her to improve her English with a free online English Language course so that she will be able to apply for a variety of different roles in the future and we remain her first port of call if
anything starts to go wrong.
Without the safety and stability of a room available to her 24/7, things might have turned out differently. The emergency winter provision has provided many of the homeless people we are supporting a safe place to rest, and also a base from which they can take the first steps towards recovery.

THANK YOU


Thank you to all those who provided financial donations towards our Winter Provision, and
thank you to all our volunteers and other members of the community who have supported
us, not just during the winter but for the duration of the time we have spent in lockdown,
including everyone at St Paul’s church for the generous weekly food donations that were
dropped off for those staying at the YHA which were gratefully received!
Thank you also to all of our staff members, for pulling together and really making a
difference.


FINANCIAL STATEMENT


INCOME EXPENDITURE
DONATIONS £45,000.00 SALARIES £44,946.80
GRANTS £22,921.00 NTS £79 PURCHASES £201.81
STAFF EXPENSES £686.41
CLIENT EXPENSES £249.49
INCOME TOTAL £67, 921.00 EXPENDITURE TOTAL £47,645.02

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7 May: Praying with Pope Francis

Looking from Greenwich to London’s Docklands financial sector. Saint Paul’s Cathedral is all-but invisible to the left.

Universal Intention: – The World Of Finance
Let us pray that those in charge of finance will work with governments to regulate the financial sphere and protect citizens from its dangers.

I guess Pope Francis feels he has had his share of being let down by those in charge of finance! It always seems to be the poorest who suffer most when finances go wrong, both at a personal and a national level. Company executives remain wealthy when their businesses go bust, while their workers lose jobs and the pensions they had been paying into. Indebted countries find their debts rising at the same time as opportunities vanish to earn more from trade and so pay off debts. And don’t ask about covid vaccinations!

Rich nations often owe part of their prosperity to exploitation of workers or other assets overseas; there is an obligation to restore fairness in trade and to protect citizens of this one world from the dangers of unfair trade, which may persist for generations.

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9 April: Praying with Pope Francis.

Saint Dunstan, Canterbury

We usually post Pope Francis’ prayer intention on the first Friday of the month, but this month it fell on Good Friday, so we postponed it until today.

Pope Francis’s Intention for April: – Fundamental Rights
We pray for those who risk their lives while fighting for fundamental rights under dictatorships, authoritarian regimes and even in democracies in crisis.

One of the fundamental rights is to health care. As we have seen with the covid-19 vaccination programme, there are authoritarian regimes, conspiracy theorists and others with influence, who have been prepared to dissuade or prevent people from receiving the vaccine. Saint Dunstan’s church was illuminated last year to publicise the world-wide programme to end polio, a crippling disease which can be prevented with a childhood vaccination programme. This has been resisted by militia men who attack and kill public health workers, alleging that the vaccination brings on other diseases.

Just one group of people prepared to risk their lives for fundamental rights. Let us pray for them and all who work for people’s rights.

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22 March: Water Day

Photograph from Sister Johanna

I didn’t know about World Water Day until recently, but it falls on March 22 each year, and gives us a chance to reflect on how we use and abuse this precious element, and how some people do not have enough for drinking, washing, farming. What follows is from CAFOD, the English and Welsh Catholic church’s overseas aid arm. The full article with a video explanation of the filter is available here.

Turning dirty water into clean water

Here at CAFOD, we are trying to turn dirty water into clean water.

For many poor communities, the local water source is a dirty pond or stream. Diarrhoea kills a young child every 90 seconds.

CAFOD’s water filter campaign is helping people who face the risk of fatal disease every time they wash, cook or drink – by providing simple, low-cost water filters for them.  

This water filter is a lifesaver. It transforms dirty water into clean, drinkable water in an hour. A lifeline for families without a clean water source. We’ve made sure that it is simple to put together and uses materials available even in remote communities.

Our water filters use just sand and charcoal. Effective, cheap and easy to maintain, they save lives.

By donating today, you can help more people in developing countries protect their health and their lives.

Donate to CAFOD’s water filter campaign

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Going Viral, International Women’s Day and Eco tip XVII (All in one post!)

Saints Mildred and Ethelbert at Saint Mildred’s, Canterbury

Good morning to you all on a rather cold and frosty morning; and I hope this finds you all well, as we are here. Yesterday I headed over to Ramsgate for my vaccination –  what a well organised and slick operation it was- hats off to all those who organised it – arm feeling achy though which is to be expected! It was strange driving to Ramsgate as I realised it was the furthest I have been in the car for about six months!


Today, 8th March 2021 is International Women’s Day, and the Mother’s Union has asked that we pray for women around the world between today and Mothering Sunday (14th March), we remember today that around the world there are women who are marginalised and oppressed or abused for just being female. who don’t have the access to opportunities for education, a safe place to live, clean water,  or some days don’t have enough food to feed their children. We give thanks for organisations such as the Mothers Union who support and encourage women both nationally and internationally. 

Morning Prayer: https://youtu.be/ATUIE7sODHk
God Bless you all and have a good day
Jo
Rev Jo Richards, Rector of the Benefice of St Dunstan, St Mildred and St Peter, Canterbury

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Another chance to feel smug and virtuous: both of us gardeners at St Mildred’s Glebe this morning were using metal flasks for our breaktime drinks, and no worries about water quality or quantity. Polish that halo before the cobwebs take over again!

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1 January: Gilbert White X: a New Year Reflection

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is bodsham-walk10-scabious.jpg

Gilbert White, Anglican curate of Selborne, Hampshire, and pioneer naturalist, is writing to his friend, Thomas Pennant, reflecting on his studies and writing. Enjoy the XVIII Century prose, but reflect: what observations should I be sharing that might induce any of my readers to pay a more ready attention to the wonders of the Creation, too frequently overlooked as common occurrences? Dip your (metaphorical) pen!

Scabius

If the writer should at all appear to have induced any of his readers to pay a more ready attention to the wonders of the Creation, too frequently overlooked as common occurrences; or if he should by any means, through his researches, have lent an helping hand towards the enlargement of the boundaries of historical and topographical knowledge; or if he should have thrown some small light upon ancient customs and manners, and especially on those that were monastic, his purpose will be fully answered. But if he should not have been successful in any of these his intentions, yet there remains this consolation behind—that these his pursuits, by keeping the body and mind employed, have, under Providence, contributed to much health and cheerfulness of spirits, even to old age:—and, what still adds to his happiness, have led him to the knowledge of a circle of gentlemen whose intelligent communications, as they have afforded him much pleasing information, so, could he flatter himself with a continuation of them, would they ever be deemed a matter of singular satisfaction and improvement.

Gil. White.
Selborne, January 1st, 1788.


 THE NATURAL HISTORY OF SELBORNE: LETTERS to THOMAS PENNANT, ESQ.

from “The Natural History of Selborne” by Gilbert White)

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Going viral LVIII: Whether you are a visitor or a parishioner you are very welcome!

 

The Catholic Parish of St Mary & St Petroc, Bodmin

A school friend is parish priest of Bodmin, in Cornwall. The parish website says, whether you are a visitor or a parishioner you are very welcome! And it gives a clear description of how Catholic parishes cope with the Virus.

Volunteer Stewards are required for each Mass to ensure sanitising of hands, track and trace forms and other guidelines are kept. This is an important part of our being able to open the church for Mass. Please contact Fr Ciaran or the office 01208 72833 if you are able to help.

Due to the ongoing Covid 19 we have to take great care in the way we come together.

  1. There is no obligation to come to Mass
  2. If you are in any way unwell or with any underlying condition DO NOT COME.
  3. When you come you will have a designated seat at a safe distance from others
  4. We ask you to wear a face covering throughout the Mass.
  5. The mass will be shorter (no singing).
  6. Communion will be at the end of Mass.
  7. There will be stewards on duty to help with the new procedures.

It is important to follow the guidelines below:

  • Hands will be sanitised on entering the church
  • Guidance to your seat will be given
  • No kneeling – sitting or standing permitted only
  • Communion will be by hand only
  • No candles will be available for lighting

Track and Trace

We are obliged to fill out the forms which accompany this letter for each Mass we attend with the time and date of Mass also.  This is an added precaution we are taking in case we are contacted by the Track & Trace system. This would only happen if they are notified of a person who has attended one of our Masses and has gone on to show symptoms.

We have to the best of our ability and Government/Diocese guidelines made Church a safe space for our parishioners to attend.

Fr. Ciarán McGuinness

Saturday Vigil Mass 12noon (This will be recorded and broadcast for those unable to attend mass.)

https://www.facebook.com/bodmincatholicparish/

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC_ELipPKOulvnhPQxAgu7NQ/

SUNDAY   9.00am

                10.30am

TUESDAY   10.00AM       ST PETROC SHARED CHURCH, PADSTOW

THURSDAY 10.00AM       ST PAUL THE APOSTLE, TINTAGEL

FRIDAY       10.00AM         ST MICHAEL CHURCH, WADEBRIDGE

Weekday masses Monday, &Wednesday  at St Mary’s Church will be at 10.00am.

The church will close immediately after each Mass.

There will be no washroom facilities

Please note in line with new government    regulations it is now mandatory to wear facial coverings when attending places of worship

You are expected to wear a face covering immediately before entering and it must kept on until you leave.

Our parish priest is Fr Ciaran McGuinness. The presbytery in Bodmin and the parish office are situated in the Parish Centre. If you wish to speak with Fr Ciaran please leave a message and he will return your call.

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