Tag Archives: homeless

31 May, Going Viral LXXVIII: with homeless people in Canterbury

CATCHING LIVES WINTER PROVISION

REPORT 2020/2021

Catching Lives is the agency that looks out for homeless people in Canterbury. One of their projects is to provide winter shelter and support for those living on the streets. It has been clear this winter that some choose not to come in from the cold, but for those that do so, some impressive help has been given. This is the report on their work this winter.

INTRODUCTION


During the winter of 2020/21 Catching Lives worked alongside other agencies, such as Canterbury City Council to offer a form of emergency accommodation under Winter Provision to as many rough sleepers as possible, giving opportunities to work with such individuals to try and find more permanent housing options for those who wanted it. The Covid-19 pandemic meant that this winter we were unable to operate our usual Canterbury Community Shelter, as clients staying would have been sleeping in a church hall, sharing the airspace, and therefore at risk of catching and spreading the covid-19 virus.

We explained to Canterbury City Council at an early stage that we would not have the funds to secure a venue at which all those staying would have their own rooms.The outcome was that Canterbury City Council were able to negotiate a licence to occupy all the rooms at the Youth Hostels Association (YHA) building on New Dover Road from 14th
December 2020 to 27th February 2021, meaning that 17 rooms were available for rough sleepers to occupy. This included their own shower and toilet facilities so they did not have to share with anyone else.

Assessments for rooms were carried out by Catching Lives Project Workers at the Canterbury Open Day Centre on Station Road East. Those allocated a room were able to keep it until they either found other suitable accommodation to move into, or had to leave due to serious behavioural issues that would have put the safety of others at risk. The YHA was staffed by two catching Lives Project Workers in the evening, who welcomed the clients in and provided them with evening meals prepared by Catching Lives volunteers earlier in the day. Two staff members were on duty overnight (one Catching Lives Project Worker and one Serveco staff member). As with previous winters, the funding for the Catching Lives staff members came from usual sources, namely generous donations from Charitable Trusts and individuals within our community.

Those staying in the YHA could access from 5pm and had to leave at 8am the following morning. They were provided breakfast and lunch, and access to other facilities such as phone, computer and washing machine use, at the Day Centre every day of the week. Art and activity packs were put together by Catching Lives’ Art Coordinator Miriam Ellis, with the support of local artists, for those staying to do in their rooms. Catching Lives Project Workers, and Outreach
Workers operating under Canterbury City Councils’ Rough Sleeper Initiative, provided ongoing support to help clients take steps towards finding housing.

This included, but is by no means limited to, help registering with a GP, referrals to mental health services, looking for work, applying for benefits, referrals for supported accommodation and signposting to the adult drug and alcohol support service run by Forward Trust.

As well as the rooms available at the YHA, Canterbury City Council also offered people temporary placement in a variety of B&Bs, hotels and shared houses (both in and outside of Canterbury). The decision whether to offer one of these locations instead of a room at the YHA involved several factors such as their level of support needs, including physical and mental health considerations. Those placed out of area were supported by the outreach workers, including two taken on by Catching Lives on a temporary contract funded by the MHCLG Winter Transformation Fund.

As always we would like to thank our local community for supporting us by donating items such as money, food and clothing, and also to those who organised fundraising events for us. We’d also like to thank all our volunteers, such as those who prepare meals for clients at the centre, and our bookshop volunteers who bring in a substantial income whilst also spreading much needed awareness of our work, for their valuable donation of their time. This is especially the case over the last year as we are aware that many of our supporters have been effected by the pandemic themselves yet have still been able to show us such tremendous support. Thank you also to all staff at the Youth Hostels Association for use of their building, and for their cooperation in making this particular part of the local winter provision possible.
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Catching Lives staff

Terry Gore – General Manager
Maria Summerson- Catching Lives Winter Provision Coordinator
Graeme Solly – Project Leader
Charlotte Hill- YHA Project Worker
Davinia Downey- YHA Project Worker
Gill Key- YHA Project Worker
Iwona Waligora – YHA Project Worker
Niki Reynolds- YHA Project Worker
Richard Hopker – YHA Project Worker
Zo Defferay- YHA Project Worker
Emma McCrudden – Outreach Worker
Megan Johnson- Outreach Worker
Paul Wardell- Outreach Worker
Dorota Witczak – Project Worker
Paul Todd – Project Worker/ YHA on call
Stephanie Hagen- Mentoring Coordinator/ Project Worker
James Duff- YHA on call/ Trustee/ volunteer
Miriam Ellis – Arts Coordinator
Karen Baxter – Mental Health Outreach
Denis Tweedie – Mental Health Outreach
Luana Ali – Client Data Coordinator
Simon Rice- Volunteer Coordinator
Paul Willoughby – Administrator
Michael James- Fundraiser

Comparison statistics
During winter provision:
27 different people stayed in the YHA for at least one night, with an average of 7 staying per night.
14 people in B&Bs were supported by Catching Lives

Why were people homeless?
Relationship breakdown 9
Loss of work/ moved for work 6
Eviction- Antisocial behaviour 10
Sale of family home 1
Issues with other tenants 3

Feeling domestic abuse 3

Eviction- could afford rent 2
Release from prison 4
Discharge from hospital 1
Passed tenancy to relative 1
Unsure 1


ACCOMMODATION OUTCOMES (as of 20/03/2021)
YHA
3 moved into private rented accommodation
2 moved into Porchlight supported accommodation
2 placed in further Winter Provision temporary accommodation by Canterbury City Council in Canterbury
7 placed in further Winter Provision temporary accommodation by Canterbury City Council outside of Canterbury
1 refused further temporary accommodation due to it being out of area and returned to rough sleeping
1 refused temporary accommodation due to it being out of area and currently sofa surfing
4 rough sleeping. Unable to contact to offer accommodation
1 sofa surfing. No offer of temporary accommodation made
5 unknown. Loss of contact.
1 in prison or custody
B&Bs
3 moved into private rented accommodation
7 remain in winter provision outside of Canterbury
4 currently sofa surfing

All clients in the B&Bs were registered with a GP; this may be because more of the clients staying in the YHA were newly arrived foreign nationals who had yet to make contact with local health services.

ANALYSIS AND RECOMMENDATIONS
In contrast to the conditions at the rolling night shelter, clients at the YHA had their own room, including their own bed; shower; and toilet. There were several positive outcomes of this, which are summarised below.
In the rolling night shelter there have been issues with clients snoring; clients have informed us that they do not want to access the rolling night shelter because their sleep is disturbed by others snoring, or making other noises during the night. Conversely, some clients have chosen not to stay at the night shelter as they themselves snore and have experienced hostility from others as a result of this. The benefit of better sleep extends beyond the night-time and reaches into other aspects of clients’ lives. Crucially, better rested and safer feeling clients are better able to access support in the Day Centre. Further, some clients are working, or seeking work, and find the conditions in the rolling night shelter unconducive to securing, or maintaining, an employment position.

The sex aspects of homelessness wherein more males than females present as rough sleepers, means that the number of female clients accessing previous rolling night shelter provision has been consistently small. On occasion, the rolling night shelter provision has seen one female sleeping in a communal area with up to nineteen male clients. Thus, for females, the communal nature of the rolling night shelter has constituted a very real barrier to their accessing the provision. One female client who had terminated her place at the rolling night shelter the year before, as the communal arrangements had escalated her anxiety to an intolerable degree, told us, “I’d rather sleep in my car”. For her, the YHA provided a safe and accessible space, in which her only objection was the lack of a TV in the private rooms, as this would have provided something for clients to occupy themselves with in the evening. The importance of developing sensitive policy responses to women’s homelessness has become a central theme in the recent research literature on homelessness, therefore these aspects of accessibility in relation to the rolling night shelter deserve further consideration.

In addition to these factors, clients often present with a history of complex childhood abuse and trauma and therefore, may feel disinclined to share a small space with other rough sleepers. Both clients and staff felt that the conditions in the YHA were more dignified than with the rolling night shelter. Staff observed that for many clients, this may be the first time in a long period that they had slept in their own private room: the YHA “was ten times more dignified than clients sleeping on a cramped floor, often within a foot’s reach of each other.” One Project Worker observed that the pandemic meant that socialising with the clients was reduced and it was “a lonely experience” for both clients – who are the main concern – and also for Project Workers. Another commented that it would have worked better if the overnight workers could have begun earlier, at 9pm, for instance, so that they could spend time with the residents, getting to know them, “making them a last drink or something to eat. You don’t see anyone until the morning when it’s all rushed and you’re rushing them through the door”. This arrangement, “would benefit clients as it would give them extra human beings to talk to”.


Other key Points are:
The task of managing and resolving conflict was enhanced as people had their own private spaces to withdraw to in the event of disagreements, or arguments.
Having a centralised location meant that bedding did not need to be transported daily therefore this aspect of the night shelter provision was less labour intensive than is usually the case.
We must continue to ensure all rough-sleepers are fully aware of the winter shelter and how it operates to hopefully allieviate any concerns some may have about accessing it.
To ensure ongoing training in how to de-escalate conflict is provided for Project Workers and staff from outside agencies who are to be involved in facilitating the night shelter, to make sure all boundaries all clear and maintained consistently.
If winter provision is carried out as a partnership in future years it is vital that all services are aware of how the referral procedure, and access arrangements work, including Out of Hours Canterbury City Council, so that communication is swift and clear.
Some staff at Catching Lives reported difficulties in communication with Canterbury City Council: “the council were frequently unresponsive to emails or phone calls, and generally did not respond in a timely way. When this happened, it impacted on our ability to provide the highest level of support for our clients.”
For Project Workers to be provided with a synopsis of each client – their current circumstance, history, if known, and particular needs – in particular, for those working on the overnight shift.

Catching Lives are incredibly grateful to the Churches who have demonstrated huge generosity in providing use of their halls during previous winter night shelters, and also the volunteers who have supported people by providing activities and food preparation. The experience from both our own perspective and also our clients’ is that the model in which
they have their own self-contained rooms is beneficial for clients in the ways that we have discussed. An ideal scenario going forward would be to continue involving the community, providing volunteering opportunities where we can, as the support of our community is vital for us to be able to keep doing what we do, but to also secure an arrangement whereby it is possible for clients to be able to access their own room or space, which would be a better model for allowing a greater number of people to access the shelter, with or without a pandemic. We are keen to have discussions with the churches who have supported us in the past, and also Canterbury City Council in order to find a model for the coming winter that best meets the needs of our clients.

Feedback from clients


When clients were asked for feedback about what could have been better with the provision, one central theme emerged. This is that the YHA could have been opened in the day for clients to use, “it was pukka, but the only thing was that they kicked you out between 7-8am and you couldn’t go back until 5pm”. This same client pointed out that if a
client presented with a temperature, they would be barred from accessing the provision due to the pandemic, but that “you’re [clients are] more likely to catch a cold outside in cold and freezing temperatures”.
Other comments echoed this: “I wish it was open longer”. Given that places such as cafes, and the library had to remain closed, in very cold weather of snow and ice clients struggled to find dry places to sit down whilst waiting to return to the YHA in the evening. For clients who were self-sufficient with an income, the situation was slightly more manageable. For one weekend clients were able to stay at the YHA during the day, and we would like to express gratitude that the Council and the YHA enabled this. Moving forward, we would like to extend this arrangement across the entire period within which the night shelter operates.

Generally, feedback from clients about the YHA was positive, with comments such as “it was better than what he had before”; and “it was very good”. A few clients expressed appreciation that their views on the provision were being sought. Other feedback includes, “staff were helpful”; and “it was good that it gave me structure to my day”.

Feedback from Project Workers


A couple of Project Workers highlighted the importance of clear and consistent communication from the outset, from both Catching Lives and Canterbury City Council. Generally, feedback was positive, with one Project Worker commenting that the night shelter, “was brilliantly run by Catching Lives” and that staff at the day centre were
“knowledgeable about almost everything I needed to know for the job”. The benefits of positive teamwork amongst the Project Workers were also highlighted with one worker stating that, “I think we pulled together well when we needed to […] covering sickness, etc.!”


Case study of a client’s experience of winter provision


-written by Megan Johnson, Project Worker supporting clients in B&B’s

Usually during the winter months churches open their doors and provide overnight shelter for people with no home to go to. The need for social distancing during the pandemic means this has not been a viable option this winter. The government issued funding to enable local authorities to address this and provide emergency winter provision.
Canterbury City Council has done so by accommodating people in hostels, B&Bs and studio flats. In some cases people could stay only overnight , in others, they could stay 24/7. For those provided with a room available day and night, they have had a time of relative security and stability, this has laid the ground for people to cope better with the challenges they face, engage consistently with our support and potentially change their situation of homelessness. Thanks to additional government COVID19 funding Catching Lives has been able to temporarily employ additional staff and spend more one-on-one time building relationships and supporting clients to progress with their recovery.

One notable example of this is a woman who lost her cleaning job due to COVID19, with the stress of being unable to pay her rent and the rampant fear during the height of the pandemic, she experienced a mental health breakdown. English not being her first language she didn’t know who she could reach out to or what statutory support was available and she ended up sleeping on the streets for several months. Canterbury City Council accommodated her in a B&B and Catching Lives have been working with her for several months now. We have been able to support her to make a successful application for the Right to Remain in the UK, a new requirement due to Brexit. Not only did this mean she could access public funds, it was a huge relief for her to know that she will be able to stay in the UK where her grown up children are living.
We accompanied and supported her for an assessment with her Mental Health Social Worker and they found that her mental health had improved significantly since the previous summer when she had been hospitalised several times. They agreed she was fit to work and so we supported her to prepare a CV and start applying for jobs, which she was
able to do from her accommodation using her mobile and the wifi of the B&B. We began searching for private rented accommodation, she wanted to stay in Canterbury where she has lived for the last seven years. During our house search a potential landlord who couldn’t offer a room but was highly empathetic to her situation gave us a lead on a
cleaning job. We contacted their recommendation and she was offered work to start once she was living back in Canterbury. Within a week we had found a room in a shared house where she felt safe and welcome. We successfully applied for a grant from the Vicar’s Relief Fund to help her pay her deposit and first months’ rent. Though happy to offer a room, the new landlord wanted ideally to see a contract of employment first. We hurriedly arranged a trial shift at the cleaning company and provided transport to and from her first day in her new job. She worked hard and successfully secured a contract which we were able to show to the landlord and we helped her move in to her new home a few days later.
Things are slowly getting back on track and for the first time in a long time, she is starting to think about the future and building the life she hopes for. We have been supporting her to improve her English with a free online English Language course so that she will be able to apply for a variety of different roles in the future and we remain her first port of call if
anything starts to go wrong.
Without the safety and stability of a room available to her 24/7, things might have turned out differently. The emergency winter provision has provided many of the homeless people we are supporting a safe place to rest, and also a base from which they can take the first steps towards recovery.

THANK YOU


Thank you to all those who provided financial donations towards our Winter Provision, and
thank you to all our volunteers and other members of the community who have supported
us, not just during the winter but for the duration of the time we have spent in lockdown,
including everyone at St Paul’s church for the generous weekly food donations that were
dropped off for those staying at the YHA which were gratefully received!
Thank you also to all of our staff members, for pulling together and really making a
difference.


FINANCIAL STATEMENT


INCOME EXPENDITURE
DONATIONS £45,000.00 SALARIES £44,946.80
GRANTS £22,921.00 NTS £79 PURCHASES £201.81
STAFF EXPENSES £686.41
CLIENT EXPENSES £249.49
INCOME TOTAL £67, 921.00 EXPENDITURE TOTAL £47,645.02

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14 December: A problematic ministry.

Here’s sobering reading as we move into winter. Although there are more people homeless in town, Canterbury’s churches contribute to caring for them and moving them on in positive way, including through ‘Catching Lives’, a local charity, and, in past years, collaborating to provide the Night Shelter in different halls through the Winter. Some people are difficult to engage with, and sometimes a little more is needed than leaving it to the experts. From the Benefice Annual Report for Saints Dunstan, Mildred and Peter, regarding last winter.

We met with Toby Coburn of Kent Police regarding B, a homeless man, who had taken up long term residency in a tent in the Churchyard. After several warnings from the Rector about his behaviour, an eviction note was left for him by Toby who made it clear that the Churchyard was not appropriate for anyone who is homeless. He moved on without any trouble.

Prior to this, Amos, who had previously been camping in the Churchyard before finding accommodation, had worked hard to tidy up the Churchyard. Following B’s departure, he cleared all the rubbish left by B, he reseeded a large area, cut back the undergrowth and overgrowth, planted shrubs, cleared the ground gutters and removed weeds and ivy and set about maintaining the Churchyard in general whilst attending a horticultural course.

His presence also acts as a deterrent to anyone wishing to take up residence in the Churchyard although on the 19th November, a little tent was erected in the churchyard near the entrance and clearly visible. The occupant who was known to Catching Lives and the Street Pastor then moved to the back where the tent could not be seen from outside. Once the night shelter was operating, he was encouraged to vacate the Churchyard.

Unfortunately damage is done to the walls of the Churchyard by people climbing over to gain access. We are very grateful to Amos for all his hard work.

We continue to try to keep rough sleepers from camping in the Churchyard, particularly as it is easy for them to damage the walls by climbing over as this is the only way they can get into the Churchyard. We try to direct them to various organisations for their safety and well being.

Rachel Cameron and Revd Jo Richards

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5 December, Going Viral LII: Street sleepers in the winter.

Another moment with Rev Jo Richards.

Good morning to you all, and another beautiful autumnal morning – though late night here last night. I was invited to join with Catching Lives, PorchLight and Canterbury City Council for their annual rough sleeper count, ie the number of folk who are sleeping rough across Canterbury (including Whitstable and Herne Bay).

To witness first hand the work that they do is quite incredible, and a privilege to have walked alongside them.  I was with the trio covering much of our Benefice, so very familiar places and homeless that I know. The streets were absolutely deserted and there was something quite special walking down these ancient deserted streets without a soul in sight, with the Christmas Lights twinkling at 2.00am. I know we often support Catching Lives and Porchlight, and it makes one realise just how important these two charities are in the way that they reach out to so many, and the work that they do.

Have a good day, God Bless
Jo
Rev Jo Richards

Rector of the Benefice of St Dunstan, St Mildred and St Peter, Canterbury

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17 October: Night Wanderers

WH Davies was a Welsh poet who knew the hostels and streets of London, and the night wanderers who could not go indoors through the coldest winters. They are back on the streets and in the closed shop doorways of Canterbury as I write. Will.

They hear the bell of midnight toll,
And shiver in their flesh and soul;
They lie on hard, cold wood or stone,
Iron, and ache in every bone;
They hate the night: they see no eyes
Of loved ones in the starlit skies.
They see the cold, dark water near;
They dare not take long looks for fear
They'll fall like those poor birds that see
A snake's eyes staring at their tree.
Some of them laugh, half-mad; and some
All through the chilly night are dumb;
Like poor, weak infants some converse,
And cough like giants, deep and hoarse." 
                                                                            W. H. Davies

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4 October: The Lady Poverty

I met her on the Umbrian hills,
Her hair unbound, her feet unshod:
As one whom secret glory fills
She walked, alone with God.

I met her in the city street:
Oh, changed was all her aspect then!
With heavy eyes and weary feet
She walked alone, with men.

Evelyn Underhill

Lest we get too sentimental about St Francis. WT.


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27 August: Heaven on earth to the weary head.

Rough sleepers encampment, St Mildred’s, Canterbury, 2019

It is a strange thing this bed, this mimic grave, where we stretch our tired limbs and sink away so quietly into the silence and rest. “O bed, O bed, delicious bed, that heaven on earth to the weary head,” as sang poor Hood, you are a kind old nurse to us fretful boys and girls. Clever and foolish, naughty and good, you take us all in your motherly lap and hush our wayward crying. The strong man full of care—the sick man full of pain—the little maiden sobbing for her faithless lover—like children we lay our aching heads on your white bosom, and you gently soothe us off to by-by. Our trouble is sore indeed when you turn away and will not comfort us.

How long the dawn seems coming when we cannot sleep! Oh! those hideous nights when we toss and turn in fever and pain, when we lie, like living men among the dead, staring out into the dark hours that drift so slowly between us and the light. And oh! those still more hideous nights when we sit by another in pain, when the low fire startles us every now and then with a falling cinder, and the tick of the clock seems a hammer beating out the life that we are watching.

From Idle Thoughts of an Idle Fellow by Jerome K. Jerome.

Jerome was writing in 1886, making his way out of poverty. He had lost his parents as a teenager, and left school early to work. He would have had real sympathy for the people represented by today’s image. All too often, over the last few years, a homeless person’s pitch has been replaced by bouquets of flowers following their death in a disused shop doorway or under a tree. This winter, the corona virus led to their being swept up off the streets. Will they be still under a roof when the crisis is over?

A few more extracts from Jerome follow; have we improved our country and our world since 1886?

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July 2, Going Viral XLI: Rev Jo’s perspective on Pope Francis’s perspective.

Pope Francis receives a blessing from Archbishop of Canterbury, Justin Welby.

Recently Rev Jo Richards directed us to Pope Francis’s contribution to the BBC Rethink programme. What can we do differently after the lock-down?

She recommends part of Pope Francis’ reflections which is well worth a read. ‘In this he reflects upon the homeless, and one profound comment he makes is:We need to tell ourselves this often: the poor person had a mother who raised him lovingly. When I caught up with some of the rough sleepers a couple of weeks ago, they said the one thing they are looking forward to is to give their mum a hug. As Pope Francis says, this has been an opportunity for us all to rethink. Powerful stuff! As we are reminded, by the words of Christ: 

‘Matthew 22: 36-40: Master, which is the great commandment in the law? Jesus said unto him, Thou shalt love the Lord thy God with all thy heart, and with all thy soul, and with all thy mind. This is the first and great commandment. …

 ‘God Bless you all, and please do keep well, keep connected and keep praying.

‘Jo🙏🙏🙏’

Rev Jo Richards Rector of the Benefice of St Dunstan, St Mildred and St Peter, Canterbury.

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14 March, Desert XVII: Simon says, have a place in our hearts.

starlings.wire

May we always have a place in our hearts for those who have no place that they can call their own.

Another of Fr Simon Denton OFM Cap’s words of wisdom. As a Franciscan, he knew the worth of poverty as lived by Saint Francis who renounced wealth and a comfortable home in Assisi to live in a community with Christ at its heart.

These starlings are not in their nesting season but it’s the time when they gather into communities – joining hundreds and thousands of others before bedding down for the night.

As they went in the way, a certain man said unto him, Lord, I will follow thee whithersoever thou goest. And Jesus said unto him, Foxes have holes, and birds of the air have nests; but the Son of Man hath not where to lay his head.

Luke 9:57-58.

I read the other day that the question to ask somebody on being introduced should not be, ‘where are you from?’ rather ‘where do you feel at home?’ The starlings would answer differently in Spring, when they are nesting, to Winter, when they are in flocks;  home is where the heart is, the nest or the shared roost. At different times of life where we are at home will change too: family, flatmates, a personal bedsit, community or commune.

Most of us, I guess, will have felt as though we don’t belong for whatever reason, even when friends and family are at hand. Having no place to lay one’s head makes the whole world into a desert.

May we always have a place in our hearts for those who have no place that they can call their own. 

And perhaps we could contribute to local groups who provide people with shelter and a path to a secure home of their own.

MMB

 

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13March, Desert 16: Surviving the Waste Places of Homelessness

campers s mildreds

The sight above, taken in January, is troubling and it is repeated across Canterbury and indeed elsewhere in Britain: homeless people camping out in all weathers. It’s clear from the picture that people have tried to help them with bedding and the tent that they are using. But talking to someone who is involved with the churches’ work, it is also clear that some people, including these campers, do choose not to accept all the help available to them.

About the same time as I took this photo I was talking to a companion of Emmaus in Dover. I was in an Emmaus community while studying in France many years ago, and it seems many things continue from those days, and indeed from the 1940s, when Abbé Pierre started the organisation near Paris. Working for the community is an important part of regaining one’s self respect.

The man I  spoke to has become a spokesman for the community. He described how, once he was on the street, he too was unable to take the hand reached out to him. It was months later that he was persuaded to give the community life a try, and it was a life saver. Now he is something of an ambassador, better able than many to get alongside those who do – and those who don’t – use the services that the churches and charities, as well as the local council, can provide. ‘And perhaps in a year or two, I’ll move on; I’m not ready yet.’ Meanwhile, practical help to cope with supported or independent living is part of Emmaus’s service; this can include help to work for qualifications that employers will recognise.

Dover logo

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January 4: Coming together at Christmastide.

madonna.s.mildred.

A short while before Christmas Janet, John from Uganda and I turned up at the ancient church of Saint Mildred in Canterbury for the Service of Nine Lessons and Carols. L’Arche being L’Arche, we often find ourselves straddling the denominations like this. Saint Mildred’s is a home from home: The L’Arche garden occupies the Glebe here1. We use their kitchen, have refreshments with the ladies on Friday mornings, and help with Harvest Festival; we have barbecues in summer, watch birds in January, and our pilgrimage across Kent finished here last May.

To represent L’Arche, now an important part of the parish, I was invited by the Rector, Jo Richards, to read the Matthew infancy narrative at the service. Saint Mildred’s is a far cry from King’s College Chapel in Cambridge whose Nine Lessons and Carols is world famous. Saint Mildred’s is not beset with Tudor self-justification and aggrandisement, as King’s is, but it looks as good, in its own way, by candlelight.

This old church remembers our little local Saxon princess who did things her own way, which was the Lord’s. She was one of those determined 7th Century princesses who wanted to study and pray in a religious community: her community is now established back at Minster Abbey where our contributor, Sister Johanna lives out her calling.

And if a few more of today’s young women were given their chance to discover, discern and live out their vocation within the church where would we be? And we are most grateful for the faithful witness of friendship extended to us by the ladies of the parish, together with Church warden Mary and Rector Jo. That helps to bring the Church back together; we should not do things apart that we could do together; we can see this maxim working well locally with the shared welcome for homeless people given by the churches.

Here is the statue of the greatest Christian woman of all time with her Son, within Saint Mildred’s church. It was candlelit for the Nine Lessons and Carols.

1A Glebe was land set apart for a parish priest to support himself – an ecclesiastical allotment.

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