Tag Archives: Laudato si’

6 June: An evening walk, Corpus Christi.

Robert Hugh Benson was the son of an Archbishop of Canterbury who became a Roman Catholic priest. He wrote many books based on his faith, including The History of Richard Raynal, Solitary, which takes the form of a translation of a mediaeval manuscript life of an English hermit, written by his parish priest. The writer went to visit his parishioner on the feast of Corpus Christi*; in those days there was much more forest cover in Southern England than we enjoy today.


I set out through the wood. I was greatly encouraged by the beauty of the light as I went down; the sun shone through the hazels on my right, and the roof of leaves was a fair green over my head; and to right and left lay a carpet of flowers as blue as the Flanders’ glass above the altar. I had learnt from Master Richard, though he was thirty years my younger, many beautiful lessons, and one of them that God’s Majesty speaks to us by the works of His almighty hands. So when I saw the green light and the gold and the blue, and the little flies that made merry in the way, I took courage.

The History of Richard Raynal, Solitary by Robert Hugh Benson

The forest could be a dangerous place in those times, and the good man would not have had an electric torch to guide him home. Let us pray for all those who live in forested areas and are suffering persecution from armed gangs and invaders robbing, kidnapping and killing them, in order to wrest control of the natural resources that should be providing a measure of stability to their lives through legitimate trade. Pray especially for the Church in Eastern Congo.

* The feast is celebrated today in England, according to my calendar.

Leave a comment

Filed under Daily Reflections, Laudato si', Pentecost, Summer

30 May: Hospitality towards Barn Owls.

Add title

At Trotton Place lived Arthur Edward Knox, whose Ornithological Rambles in Sussex, published in 1849, is one of the few books worthy to stand beside White’s Natural History of Selborne.+ In Sussex, as elsewhere, the fowler* has prevailed, and although rare birds are still occasionally to be seen, they now visit the country only by accident, and leave it as soon as may be, thankful to have a whole skin.

Guns were active enough in Knox’s time, but to read his book to-day is to be translated to a new land:

“I have the satisfaction of exercising the rites of hospitality towards a pair of barn owls, which have for some time taken up their quarters in one of the attic roofs of the ancient, ivy-covered house in which I reside. I delight in listening to the prolonged snoring of the young when I ascend the old oak stairs to the neighbourhood of their nursery, and in hearing the shriek of the parent birds on the calm summer nights as they pass to and fro near my window; for it assures me that they are still safe; and as I know that at least a qualified protection is afforded them elsewhere, and that even their arch-enemy the gamekeeper is beginning reluctantly, but gradually, to acquiesce in the general belief of their innocence and utility, I cannot help indulging the hope that this bird will eventually meet with that general encouragement and protection to which its eminent services so richly entitle it.”

There is a benevolently naive verbosity about some writers of Edwardian times, as we British count the XX Century before the Great War. This passage is from “Highways and Byways in Sussex” by E. V. Lucas, 1904, but of course the story from Knox is older still. I hope both men would appreciate today’s general good will and legal protection towards birds and the scientific study of them, but they both could tell us something of what has been lost in the years since then; although most birds are now legally protected, we should be less complacent; where are the cuckoos, martins and swallows we expected to see and hear thirty, even twenty years ago?

+ See White on Worms, 20 May, and search elsewhere in the blog.

* Fowler: someone who hunts and shoots birds (even rare ones).



Leave a comment

Filed under Daily Reflections, Laudato si'

15 May: Environmental Novena, II

The Catholic Bishops of England & Wales and Scotland have invited Christians to join in a Novena – nine days of prayer – for our planet and for discernment of what we should be doing to care for it. Here is the second post.

he has united himself definitively to our earth, 
and his love constantly impels us 
to find new ways forward.”
Laudato Si’, 13; 245

Leave a comment

Filed under Interruptions, Justice and Peace, Laudato si', Mission

14 May: Environment Novena, I

The Catholic Bishops of England & Wales and Scotland have invited Christians to join in a Novena – nine days of prayer – for our planet and for discernment of what we should be doing to care for it. Here is the first day’s post.

A thought from today’s extract from Pope Francis’s Laudato si’:

God of love, show us our place in this world
as channels of your love
for all the creatures of this earth”
Laudato Si’, 13; 246

Leave a comment

Filed under Interruptions, Justice and Peace, Laudato si'

Last two tips, Happy Easter from Eco-church.

image.png

Bin liners are a constant plastic we use in our everyday lives, however if we all transitioned to plastic-free or compostable ones we would greatly reduce its impact on nature. 

image.png

Number 40! Changing your dietary lifestyle can make a huge impact on how much plastic you use. Nut milks mostly come in recyclable cartons and you can purchase your beans and nuts loose from places like unboxed! 

https://www.vegansociety.com/go-vegan/how-go-vegan

Leave a comment

Filed under Justice and Peace, Laudato si', Lent, Mission

3 April: If we will hear.

white violets

It’s that in-between day. The day when fresh linen is spread over the stripped altar, when church dusting is done, the floor and brass polished, the flowers gathered in and arranged. Christina Rossetti invites us to Consider the lilies of the field; her message, one we have been reminded of more than once this week, is HOPE. Jesus found Mary in the garden, after all. Consider that one small seed that was laid in the garden tomb.

A Scottish Rose.

CONSIDER THE LILIES OF THE FIELD.

Flowers preach to us if we will hear:–
The rose saith in the dewy morn,
I am most fair;
Yet all my loveliness is born
Upon a thorn.
The poppy saith amid the corn:
Let but my scarlet head appear
And I am held in scorn;
Yet juice of subtle virtue lies
Within my cup of curious dyes.
The lilies say: Behold how we
Preach without words of purity.
The violets whisper from the shade
Which their own leaves have made:
Men scent our fragrance on the air,
Yet take no heed
Of humble lessons we would read.
 

But not alone the fairest flowers:
The merest grass
Along the roadside where we pass,
Lichen and moss and sturdy weed,
Tell of His love who sends the dew,
The rain and sunshine too,
To nourish one small seed.”

From Poems by Christina Rossetti.

2 Comments

Filed under Daily Reflections, Easter, Laudato si', Lent, poetry

Eco Tip XIX – Fantastic refillables.

image.png

Many laundry detergents contain loads of microplastics that ultimately end up in the ocean and negatively affect marine life. Even more so, the bottles are either incinerated or dumped in a landfill where they can take up to 500 years to decompose!

https://www.splosh.com/refills

https://smolproducts.com – we use this one for dishwasher and laundry and found it excellent – and gets delivered to the door, and all plastic free, and very competitively priced, Rev. Jo

A job that is never done!

Leave a comment

Filed under corona virus, Justice and Peace, Laudato si', Lent

Eco tip XIV: forget paper post!

image.png

We get a lot of unneeded paper mail at our door, ranging from promotions to bank statements. So, how about changing all paper mail to virtual ones instead! Most banks do this and over the course of a year you might be saving stacks of paper that would have otherwise gone to the bin!

Leave a comment

Filed under Daily Reflections, Justice and Peace, Laudato si', Lent, Mission

DAILY ECO TIP XI: going to the dogs.

Daily Eco Tip 11

If you are a pet owner, then you know how many plastic toys you go through. So, why not invest in some plastic-free ones? Also, having a ceramic bowl can be a better alternative to a flimsy plastic one.

https://www.dogbuddytoys.com/our-eco-toys

https://www.thenaturalpetstore.co.uk/product-category/dogs/natural-dog-toys/

Leave a comment

Filed under Justice and Peace, Laudato si', Lent

DAILY ECO TIP IX: straws in the wind

When did I last have a milk shake?

Daily Eco Tip 9

You may have heard of metal straws before and brushed them off, but this is one of the best ways to reduce your plastic usage when you are at a restaurant. Also, they go great with a cold milkshake.

https://www.etsy.com/uk/market/metal_straws

https://www.oliverbonas.com/homeware/metal-straws-pack-of-four

Leave a comment

Filed under Christian Unity, Laudato si', Lent