Tag Archives: Mrs Zebedee

28 May: Pilgrimage to Canterbury VIII: All Coming together

dover5.crest waveThose who are preparing the pilgrimage keep telling ourselves: it’s all coming together!

There was, when I wrote this,still a month before the pilgrims put foot to footpath which was just as well. Catering, comfort breaks, car rides for the weary, climbing up the Downs, covering the route step by step; all this preparation allows the real purpose of the pilgrimage to be fulfilled. And in real life, today is the day we make that first step! 

Just a closer walk with Thee,
Grant it, Jesus, is my plea,
Daily walking close to Thee,
Let it be, dear Lord, let it be.

We are a community: part of the closer walk with Jesus is walking with each other. We know that Jesus and his disciples did a lot of walking around Palestine, and sometimes the disciples’ conversation was far from edifying. Jesus had to rebuke Mrs Zebedee when she wanted him to give James and John top posts in his new government, and to remind the disciples – who had been arguing on the road about who was the greatest – that the greatest of all must be the servant of all.

No wonder he was glad to play with the children at the end of the day!

There will be many opportunities for each of us to serve our fellow walkers during our four days on the road. This time of preparation has  been itself a time of service.

We hope to say more about the pilgrimage itself in the days to come.

The Crest of a Wave monument marks the start of the Pilgrims’ Way to Canterbury and the Channel Swim to France. Let’s hope for blue skies as we walk!

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18 May: Power Corrupts

snowgapa

Do you ever, probably unconsciously, feel that a teaching of Jesus is not aimed personally? Recently I had a reminder to think again. I’m thinking of this little story from the Lord’s final journey to Jerusalem. Mrs Zebedee has just tried to get top jobs for James and John.

Jesus called the apostles to him, and said: You know that the princes of the Gentiles lord it over them; and they that are the greater, exercise power upon them. It shall not be so among you: but whosoever will be the greater among you, let him be your minister: And he that will be first among you, shall be your servant. Even as the Son of man is not come to be ministered unto, but to minister, and to give his life a redemption for many.

Matthew 20:25-28

I’m no Prince of the Gentiles, and indeed the royal princes in the United Kingdom seem to have taken this text to heart. But still, ‘It shall not be so among you’ suggests that Jesus expected that it often would be. The various scandals in the Church are to do with exercising power over other people.

But a more mundane instance hit me during the cold spell we had in March. I had to go to a place where dedicated people care for others, and to reach the area where the  hands-on care actually actually happens, walked past the administration offices. The path as far as that door had been treated with grit, so that all the snow had melted and walking was easy. For the last fifteen metres the grit had not been applied.

If you asked the admin staff straight out, are you more important than the carers, they could hardly say yes. But the pathway tells another story.

So perhaps a little examination of conscience on where I might be lording it over people? Even though I never thought I was?

When Peter’s mother-in-law was cured, she at once ministered to Jesus and his companions. With all the gifts I have received, I should be ministering to his friends too.

PS: spare a thought and prayer for Prince Harry and Meghan Markle as they prepare to marry tomorrow. The timing of this post was co-incidental; I only noticed on rereading it today.

WT.

Different town, different winter, deeper snow…

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March 21st Monday of Holy Week: Who prepared the feast?

lambforslaughter

 

Saint Luke (22:7-13) tells us it was Peter and John that Jesus sent to prepare the Upper Room for the Passover Feast. He goes on to say that ‘when the hour was come, he sat down, and the twelve apostles with him’ (v17).

Traditionally, of course, we see paintings of just the thirteen of them around the table, John leaning against Jesus, Judas already detached, off to one side. But was Jesus alone with his apostles? I wonder. From what we know of Mrs Zebedee, she would have been incapable of letting one of her boys get on with such an all-important domestic task and ritual without her help and advice. She would have ignored it if John was still cold-shouldering her after the public embarrassment of her trying to get him a top cabinet post (Matthew 20:20).

The question is all but answered when we read about them at table, asking who would betray him. Jesus said it was one of the twelve (Mark 14:20); no need to say that unless others were there.

Fast forwarding to Pentecost Sunday (Acts 1: 13-15), we find 120 people gathered in the Upper Room, including the Lord’s Mother; a dozen would have been rattling around. So I am inclined to read the Gospel accounts as though the 120, more or less, were present at the Last Supper, including the women mentioned in Acts 1.

No potatoes to peel for the Passover, since they had not yet been imported from South America, but plenty of jobs to do. I’m sure Mrs Zebedee and the other women were happy enough to let John and Peter slaughter the lamb; after all, they were fishermen, used to killing humanely. But trust her lad and Peter to put the meal on the table? I wonder!

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