Tag Archives: ordination

26 June, Going Viral: Ember Days

SS Mildred and Ethelbert

I remembered the name, Ember Days, but had forgotten what they were about; the term disappeared from Catholic parlance. Rev Jo reminds us in her latest post. Let’s pray for all ordinands in all churches this Petertide.

Good morning everyone, it certainly thundered first thing this morning, with some welcome rain, but all seems well now. Hope you are all well, as we are here.

Thoughts and prayers today for all our ordinands and deacons today – tomorrow they should have been in the Cathedral, ordained as deacons, priests, with priests  looking forward to taking their first communion on Sunday – but none of that is to be. Though I do understand that the ordinands will be going to their new prarishes, and to be ordained in September.

Today is also referred to as an Ember Day – the lectionary describes this as “Ember days should be kept, at the bishop’s directions, in the week before an ordination as days of prayer for those to be ordained as deacon or priest. Ember days may also be kept even when there is no ordination in the diocese as more general days of prayer for those who serve in the church in its various ministries, both lay and ordained and for all vocations. So please do keep them in your prayers. It was six years ago on Sunday that I was ordained deacon here in Canterbury. A day to remember!!

Apologies it’s late, another zoom meeting!

Keep safe, keep connected and keep prayingJo🙏🙏🙏
Rev Jo Richards Rector of the Benefice of St Dunstan, St Mildred and St Peter, Canterbury

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Filed under Christian Unity, corona virus, Mission

African Missionaries to Africa

The final stages of becoming a Missionary of Africa priest, or White Father, are to take the  Missionary Oath and Diaconate . This happened just before Christmas in Merrivale, South Africa for 18 young men from many African countries and from India. Follow the link to read an account of the two ceremonies, but here is an extract from Deacon Jean–Baptiste Todjro’s account, appropriate for today’s Feast of the Holy Innocents and Sunday’s of the Holy Family:

One word was echoed strongly throughout the celebration of our Missionary Oath and Diaconate Ordination: FAMILY. Prior to the celebration of the oath, Didier Sawadogo, representing the Superior General, presented to us the message of the General Council by giving to each of us the positive affirmation of our Society which states: ‘Filled with the joy of the Gospel and guided by the Spirit, we are an intercultural missionary society with a family spirit. Sent out to the African world and wherever our charism is needed, for a prophetic mission of encounter and of witness to the love of God’ (Capitular Acts 2016:17). It is with this sense of belonging and willingness that we responded YES to the call of God and the desire of making God’s love known and flourish in the African world. The word FAMILY was at the heart of the homily of Cardinal Wilfrid Napier who in addressing us insisted that we have to participate in the mission of the Church and identify the challenges that families are facing as our primary mission in collaboration with the universal Church. As such one can boldly say we are ordained to be APOSTLES TO FAMILIES, NOTHING BUT APOSTLES TO FAMILIES.

Let’s pray that God will give them all the graces to be just that, apostles to families; and that we, too, may recognise and live out this same vocation.

MMB

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Filed under Advent and Christmas, Daily Reflections, PLaces

8 July: The Scandal of Disunity

justin-welby_blesses_francis2

There are signs of hope. Here is Francis, Bishop of Rome, receiving a blessing from Justin, Archbishop of Canterbury. No charade, surely? The Pope would not bring about scandal by seeking a blessing from a heretic schismatic. When Bishop Nicholas Hudson joined Bishop Trevor Willmott in blessing the congregation at Canterbury Cathedral, what were we to make of the implied recognition of value in Anglican orders?

The scandal is not that these isolated events happen, but that we lack the courage of our convictions, so they remain isolated. Forty years ago I was assured that, juridically, Anglican orders were all valid since Old Catholic bishops had taken part in enough ordinations to ensure recognition of Anglican Apostolic Succession.

In another church, a good distance from Canterbury, a Catholic bishop was ordained recently, with his friend, co-worker and Anglican bishop, robed on the sanctuary. It was good to see him there, but he was not invited to join the Catholic bishops by laying hands on the ordinand.

And the announcement that day deterring non-Catholics from receiving the Eucharist? If a bishop being ordained is not one of those special occasions when Eucharistic hospitality is to be encouraged, I’m not clear when it may be grudgingly permitted. Put out into the deep!

WT.

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Filed under Daily Reflections