Tag Archives: reading

Note about the Franciscan Study Centre

 

Our readers will be aware that the Franciscans have closed their Study Centre in Canterbury. This message from Ms Pat Brookhouse, a faithful friend of the Study Centre may answer a few questions about what is happening.
I know that some people were concerned about what was going to happen to some of the contents of the centre. The following has been put together with the help of Br Antony Jukes.
 
 
As Some of you will have seen in the local paper the centre is now owned by a development company “Empiric Student Property”.
I thought you might also like to know how the contents of the centre have been dispersed.
 
The new owner requested that the houses and contents remain intact so that they could continue to rent them out to students.  They also requested that the kitchen be left open though the rest of the main building was to be left empty.
 

The Contents of the Library.

General Philosophy went to St Bonaventure’s College in Lusaka, Zambia. General Theology, Scripture, Liturgy etc. went to Holy Trinity College, Harare, Zimbabwe. Most of the caged section of the library went to second hand specialist booksellers. A few of the very old rare books will be auctioned by Sotheby’s in the hope that they will find a new home and owner who can properly maintain them.
 
The Franciscan collection has gone to St Mary’s University Twickenham and it is their intention to put on a Franciscan weekend possibly in the new year with invited speakers. They are wanting to use the collection and so it is hoped that in the future they may try to put together a Franciscan course of some sort.

Chapel and General Fittings

The Organ has gone to Fr. Stefan’s Conventual Community in Romania. Many things including the altar and lectern have gone to Ramsgate (the old Benedictine Abbey) which is now The Divine Retreat Centre run by the Syro-Malibar community. They also took most of the furniture from the main building. The Stations of the Cross will remain nearby: the University of Kent Catholic Chaplain, Fr Peter Geldard, has accepted these with the stand for the tabernacle, to furnish their new chapel. The statue of St Francis will be erected within Saint Thomas’ Church, Canterbury.

And various other items have found homes.

Thank you Pat, for your efforts in gathering this information.

HARVESTCHAPEL

May the Harvest of FISC be abundant: One sows, another reaps.

WT

 
 
 
 
 
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July 27: Portraits in a Mirror.

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The silence in the lounge continued. No one said a word. They all

seemed to be staring into the distance or searching for something to

gaze upon.

Yves Rivière’s face was depressingly sad. His expression was one of a

person stuck in an empty shell, a person who holds an unfamiliar

sorrow within and a shame unrecognised. Everyone in the lounge

felt it. As if thinking aloud, they revisited the part they played in the

whole issue.

If you were there and could just look at each of their faces, your

heart would be broken. They all exchanged painful glances with

moist eyes. The lounge felt cold with a quality of sadness. Every eye

was tearful. It was a desperately solemn sight to behold and even

more painful to retain in the memory.

Yves kept staring at the portrait of Felix hanging over the

fireplace. To distract himself from his emotions, he reached out to the

book on the walnut tea table next to Florence. The book was entitled:

Portraits in a Mirror. The words on the very first line on the first page

were:

There were four poems …

Yves gently took his eyes off that page and I think he dropped

the book suddenly on the floor, I am not entirely sure. Letting his

gaze fall on the floor, he bowed his head in shame. One feeling was

reawakened in him: guilt.

Meanwhile in the bedroom, tucked in their cot, the twins: Flora

and Felix seem to have stopped crying.

It starts to rain.

The End

VE

raincloudsCaernarfon

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19 May: The Great Lie.

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Reading for Sext

All baptised in Christ, you have all clothed yourselves in Christ, and there are no more distinctions between Jew and Greek, slave and free, male and female, but all of you are one in Christ Jesus.

(Galatians 3: 27-28)

I loved books as child and read my way through the whole of the children’s library in my local village. As the day of my adult membership came nearer I marked in my mind the books on the adult shelves I was going to read first. I had a mind that loved all things supernatural and as a child read about faeries and goblins and witches; traditional tales of Hans Christian Anderson that still make me weep and sci fi. Oooh I love sci-fi but also classics like Jane Eyre, the Mill on the Floss and Silas Marner.

One book has stayed in my conscience and I recollected it recently after MOAB was dropped by the US in Afghanistan. It was a sci fi story and I cannot remember author or title – not a well-known one, I think – about an Earthman who was called to investigate a growing darkness spreading across the galaxy like a dark finger. All planets in contact with this darkness went utterly mad. He witnessed the madness but could not fathom its cause. It was utterly destructive. In frustration, he went to the Central Planets and awaited the inevitable doom of the people whom he had come to love and respect. He asked them to steel themselves and prepare for the worst, but they ignored him and carried on joyfully and peacefully with their lives, as they had always done. He was tearing his hair out as the darkness consumed one planet after another in the solar system, getting ever nearer this special place. The darkness enveloped the planet, yet nothing happened. No madness, no wars, no mental breakdowns. All went on as before.

Puzzled, he went to talk to the beings who had commissioned his service in the first place and realised what had happened. The inhabitants of the planet immune to the darkness were uninfluenced by the one thing that had destroyed all the other planets. They paid no attention to lies. The darkness was The Great Lie.

Christ calls Satan the Father of All Lies and perhaps the humble sci fi writer from the 1950’s used this as inspiration to suggest to us, in the form of a simple story, to pay no attention whatsoever to what is not truth. To do so means we need to clothe ourselves in Christ, so we may discern truth from lies.

In this era of fake news, tragedy and frightening weapons, maybe we can take heart from these simple, joyful beings who pay no attention to anything that is not of Christ. Oh, yes, we have them living among us – Franciscans! May the force be with you.

CW.

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16 May: Doctor of Theology – John Stone, martyr.

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Much is written about St Brendan (whose day it is today) and his epic voyages across the seas to bring the Gospel to others. There is even a myth he may have reached South America. However, I wanted to write about another saint who is lesser known and whose day this is also. John Stone lived at the time of the Reformation which has become an interest of mine due to a series of novels by the historian C J Sansom. The books are about a hunchbacked lawyer called Matthew Shardlake and his adventures during tremendously unstable times for religious thinking and belief in King Henry VIII’s reign.

John Stone was a Doctor of Theology from Canterbury who opposed the King’s wish to divorce his first wife Catherine of Aragon. During the dissolution of the monasteries all religious were expected to sign a document which acknowledged the King as the Head of the church in England – The Act of Supremacy. John Stone refused to sign and was carted off to the Tower where, C J Sansom tells us, torture was inflicted on the prisoners. It was a brutal and grisly time – has the world improved, I wonder? John was returned to Canterbury to be tried. He was found guilty under the Treason’s Act and hung, drawn and quartered, his head and body being left on display for being a traitor.

Sansom’s novels show us the profits and land deals that were made on the back of the sale of religious houses and properties. Of course, the full truth was riddled with complexities and the changing whims of King Henry, yet those who do not follow the tenets of more dictatorial leaders, even in our times, are subject to persecution. Men of principle, such as John Stone, however, shine forth. I do recommend Mr Sansom’s books but beware, once you read one, you will want to read them all. What shall I do when I reach the end of his final book in the series? Sob!

CW.

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Thank you all once again!

karins-flowers

I noticed recently that there are more than a hundred people following this blog, and we know there are others who dip in and out.

Time to say another ‘thank you’ to all our readers and supporters! A ‘like’ or a comment can only be encouraging to our contributors and to me as editor.

Please drop us the occasional line to let us know what you enjoy or what challenges you’d like us to take up. Coming soon is a set of posts responding to one of our readers who posted recently on her own blog about the possible imminent death of the Catholic Church. Not yet, BBB, not yet!

Have a good end to Lent, and if you are a mother, happy Mother’s Day on Sunday!

Karin arranged these flowers for us when we visited her and Winfried over the summer. Thank you again for your welcome!

God Bless us, every one!

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23 February: Detective Stories for a Post-Truth Age

We are told that we are living in a ‘post-truth age’. The President of the United States has his staff put out alternative facts – or lies – when the verifiable truth is uncomfortable. Climate change is a conspiracy theory. The Muslims (en masse) are out to get us. A referendum is held, lies are told, 37% of people vote to leave the EU – but the people have spoken, although those living overseas could not vote, any more than Scots living in England were able to vote in the Scottish Independence Referendum.

1968, Czechoslovakia. The half-million strong, Russian-led Warsaw pact armies invaded to put down the Prague Spring. 18 months ago we briefly remembered that event and the Velvet Revolution that followed, before 1968 was forgotten, bringing freedom to millions. Click on  Wenceslas .

1968 – 1989 was an era of post-truth in Czechoslovakia following the “Entry of the Fraternal Armies Rendering Brotherly Help to the Czechs and Slovaks”. Jews are Zionists who want to turn the clock back and have no regard for the historical role of the working class. It is a crime to leave the country: if you do so, your family will suffer. A professor may find himself swinging a pickaxe for revisionist crimes. Others might be executed as political criminals. A policeman almost imperceptibly sinks into the grey, sad world of a class warfare he has never really believed in. Crimes his team have solved go unpunished because they are committed by people with connections.

I had never read any of Josef Skvorecky’s books till I picked up The End of Lieutenant Boruvka in a charity shop. I will be seeking out more of them. The short stories flow gently on, leading us into ever greater collusion with evil, crises of conscience sliding past as dear ones are protected, blackmail is applied.

Is there redemption? It often looks bleak for Lieutenant Boruvka, who is often hemmed in, with little choice over what to do with the results of his investigations. Find this book and read it, and pray for perseverance in seeking out and telling the truth, and in forming and following your conscience.

MMB.

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August 23: Reflections on Living Together, III: Armchair Travel and Richard of Chichester.

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NW Tower, Chichester Cathedral.

The spirit of discord and hatred that is evident today needs God’s grace to overcome it. With God’s grace we can be instruments of his mercy and peace at a personal level. A simple ‘Good Morning’, in whatever language, is a word of peace. A smile, a compliment, a helping hand, a joke.

And perhaps we should travel to broaden the mind and heart. If we cannot leave home we can travel through the printed word or the television screen. And Christian, Jew or Muslim can pray these words of Saint Richard of Chichester:

May I see you more clearly,

Love you more dearly,

And follow you more nearly,

Day by Day.

MMB.

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5th June 2016: Interruption: the King of glory shall come in.

 

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mercylogoWe are, somewhat belatedly perhaps, addressing the year of Mercy. Pope Francis began the year in Bangui, Central African Republic, opening the Holy Door in the Cathedral there. But open any door or gate, open any book, and you could find something new, something beautiful, when you cross the threshold.

Are you going in to spend time in a friend’s house, or leaving home on a mission – even if it’s only to the shop for bread, you can be walking out, or walking in, for God, alongside him. Feeding the family may be your mission for today, either buying the daily bread or working to afford it. Out you go to your work, come back to your home, and remember he is at your side as he was with the disciples on the road to Emmaus (Luke 24). Open your gate, and let him in!

Lift up your heads, O ye gates; and be ye lift up, ye everlasting doors; and the King of glory shall come in. PS 24:7 

Various members of our team will be writing about mercy in the next few weeks, but we start today with Pope Francis’s words as he threw open the Holy Door of Mercy at Bangui Cathedral.

WT.

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* 22/1/16 A Thirst for Literature

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Just after the end of the war it was announced that a new free public lending library was to be opened in our little town. This announcement sparked off a great deal of argument
and indeed one might say contention. My Mum and Dad were strongly in favour but my Mum’s  brother, Uncle Jack, and many others were equally strongly opposed saying that people should pay for their pleasures and if books were going to be free why not cinema seats. If it was going to be seen as a help to education why should it not be funded by the Education budget. However, after a while tempers cooled somewhat and a general consensus was reached that perhaps a library was evidence of a more cultured society appropriate to the development of a growing urban area after all the rigours of the war. So a vote was taken and the measure was passed with a comfortable majority.

The next stage was that an old office building was donated by one of the local ‘grandees’ and the necessary building work to convert this edifice into a library was initiated. Finally it was finished and the opening date was announced. The children’s library was to be opened a day later after school at 4 pm. A vast number of us kids, all excitement and eager anticipation, gathered outside and eventually the doors were opened. I was swept up a steep, narrow staircase and I don’t think my feet touched the ground until I arrived at the actual library crammed with shelves. I could not turn my head to actually see the book titles properly and as my nose was clamped between two books and my arms were pinioned by the boy behind me, who couldn’t  move either, so  I could only extract one, unknown, book. I hoped it would be a ’Biggles’ action packed story or perhaps one of Fennimore Cooper’s western adventures or even some of Captain Marryat’s tales of battles at sea. Eventually I had my loan recorded and exhausted I staggered back home keeping my treasured volume safe in my school bag.

My Dad was sitting in front of the fire reading. “Did all go well son? What have you borrowed on your first expedition to our new centre of learning? Oh yes a very good choice, ‘What does Science offer us’, so much better than those silly ‘Biggles’ books I find in your bedroom. How can anyone take seriously a person with such a ridiculous name?”

I recalled that my Dad had spent many a wet Sunday afternoon telling me tales of his favourite hero, Dick Turpin, the highwayman who was eventually hung at York. I recalled that a remote relative of my father’s was also hung as a ‘gentleman of the road’, at Caernarfon Castle in 1822. What a blotch on the family escutcheon and who could take seriously a name like ‘Dick Turpin’. ‘What goes round, comes round’.

DBP.

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