Tag Archives: Saint Paul

9 December: Mercy, a Tentmaker of Tarsus.

PAULCONVERSION (206x800)

Let’s take another snapshot from Masefield’s Coming of Christ.

And also there was Paul, receiving mercy, proclaiming mercy:

A tentmaker of Tarsus,

Who will deny you and denounce your followers

To torment and to death; and then will see

Your truth by sudden lightning of the mind,

And then go through the world, telling your truth,

Through scourgings, stoning, bonds, beating with rods,

The wild beasts in the ring, worse beasts in men;

To the sharp sword outside the city gates,

Glad beyond words to drink of your sweet cup,

Lifted and lit by you, christened by you,

Made spirit by you, I who slew your saints.

(P14)

Jesus told James and John: My chalice indeed you shall drink; but to sit on my right or left hand, is not mine to give to you, but to them for whom it is prepared by my Father. Matthew (20:23) We shall drink of his cup – whether sweet or bitter; we will be lifted and lit by him and strengthened to be tellers of his truth and sharers of his mercy.

WT.

Advertisements

Leave a comment

Filed under Daily Reflections, poetry

November 28: Jacopone da Todi 2. Attending to Faces in a Dark Mirror

water-pool-reflection-508x640

When we aim to understand ourselves in a deeper way, and spend time focussing inwards, the dark impressions which we recover at first are not reassuring. We may experience our soul’s troubled waters as a shadowy pool. What light we find there feels moody, insubstantial and even riddled with foreboding.

When St. Paul said ‘we see as through a glass darkly’, (1 Corinthians 13:12) it was surely the kind of seeing we attempt to enjoy as the character and creative traits of others. But at first we are not skilled in reading these correctly. We meet the mistrust and suspicion of others, or display to them more of our own suspicion than we would have wished them to notice. Jacopone tackles this clash well.

“Draw yourself up to your full stature

And thunder me a sermon for the mote in my eye.

You scorn me, oblivious of the beam in your own.

Tend your own wounds, so wide and deep they cannot heal.

 

“Students of Scripture, you want to preach,

And point out the darkness in my life, ignoring yours;

You make a show of your exterior, and have little love

For anyone who would search your heart instead.”

We sometimes wonder, when we lock horns, who will back down first? But as Christians we each have reserves of humility in our shady, glassy inner pool. We have to trust these and plunge into them as we would plunge into God, for the sake of a genuine friendship.

 

Chris D.

October 2016.

Leave a comment

Filed under Daily Reflections, poetry

Autumn Evening Lectures at FISC: “What is theology saying?”

austinFr Austin McCormack will be speaking on Thursday evenings this term. I recommend these lectures to any Christian, including those from Reformation traditions who may wonder what we Catholics are all about. Please feel free to come to as many of these lectures as interest you.
Start time 19.00. You are asked to make a donation to cover expenses.
WT.
The subject of the course is:

“What is theology saying?”

6. 17/11:  What difference does Grace make?
7. 24/11: What about Original Sin?
8. 01/12: What morality did Jesus teach?
9. 08/12: Should we renounce the world or change it?
10. 15/12: Is there salvation in other religions?

Leave a comment

Filed under Daily Reflections

November 5: Ready for anything anywhere.

harvest-god-provides
(Image from Polyvore.com)

Saul of Tarsus/ St. Paul was a person who engaged with life and his faith and quickly came to terms with them. As a Jew, he responded with wholehearted zeal to God’s will as he saw it, persecuting the Christians. As a Christian, he was equally as wholehearted and zealous in travelling around preaching the Good News. As he said in today’s reading: “I am ”.

How was he able to confidently proclaim this, considering the insecurity of his lifestyle: hunger, cold, accidents, thieves, and so on?  The reason for his confidence was his faith: “There is nothing I cannot master with the help of the One who gives me strength”.   Paul was speaking of God, the One Who will help us in all our difficulties if only we turn to Him and trust Him.  He was ready to put up with anything to attain his goal of making Christ known and loved, to help others to grow in relationship with God.  He knew that, as the Psalmist said, God was “a shield about Him”.

Although Paul knew that he was dependent on God for everything, he also knew that God works through people.  It has been said that on this earth He has no hands but ours, no feet but ours. The Philippians had helped Paul with their gifts. Paul was delighted at their generosity, not only because it would help him, but also because, in his words, it would be “interest mounting up in their account” with God.  They were learning that, as Jesus had said, the way to love God whom one could not see was to show love to one’s brothers and sisters.

Paul’s attitudes challenge us: have we got faith enough to face whatever situations we encounter with complete trust?  And do we show our faith by our actions?

FMSL

 

Leave a comment

Filed under Daily Reflections

November 4: Saint Charles Borromeo.

charles-borromeo

Today is the memorial of Saint CHARLES Borromeo (Bishop)

Scripture readings: St Paul to the Philippians 3:17-41, Psalm 121, Luke 16:1-8.

In the Gospel, Christ told his disciples a parable about an astute steward. In this parable, we see how this dishonest steward uses his master’s property to win friendship for himself. This is because he said, if my master sends me away, I cannot dig, I can’t go begging for I will be too ashamed of myself. I have to use my master’s wealth to win friendship for myself so that there will be people to welcome me when my master sends me away.

All of us have God’s gift in us. It could be the gift of singing or the gift of service. The question is how am I using God’s gifts to win heaven in Christ?  This dishonest servant used his master’s wealth to win friendship for himself. What about you and I whom God have given so many treasures?

St Charles Borromeo became a true shepherd of the flock that God had entrusted to him. He used God’s gifts to gain heaven.

St Paul is telling me and you today in the letter to the Philippians not to be ashamed of the things of heaven but rather to be ashamed of earthly things, not to give up our hope, but to be faithful in the Lord.

May God grant us the grace to be faithful to Him at all times, Amen.

 

FMSL

Leave a comment

Filed under Daily Reflections

November 3: Saint Martin De Porres

martin-de-porres

Today is the Memorial of Saint Martin De Porres. (Dominican Religious)

Scripture readings: St. Paul to the Philippians 3:3-8; Psalm  104; Luke 15: 1- 10.

St Paul says writes: “Because of Christ, I have come to consider all the advantages that I had as disadvantages.” Paul had everything and every qualification as a Roman citizen. He was fastidious in keeping the Law of the Jews but something was lacking.  He did not know Christ. When Christ was revealed to him, he gave up everything to preach the Kingdom of God.

The same thing could be said of St. Martin De Porres. As a young man, he learnt the profession of a dispenser of medicine. He was comfortable in life. But he found something was lacking in his life as well. He then joined the Dominican Order and used his skill to work for the poor for the sake of the kingdom of Heaven.

Today, in my comfort and advantageous life, what am I doing for Christ? I can do something where I am no matter how small it might be. Even if it means looking at someone on the street with MERCY.  What am I giving away for the sake of Christ? What am I considering as disadvantage for the sake of the Kingdom of Christ?  It is possible for any of us to make a U-turn back to God. Jesus says in the Gospel of Luke 15:1-10 that ‘”there is joy among the angels of God over one repentant sinner.”’

FMSL

Leave a comment

Filed under Daily Reflections, Year of Mercy

8 October: Our Inward Mirror or Conscience.

milkyway

By calling this blog a Mirror we set out to be reflective.

Recently Sister Johanna wrote to the editor offering some reflections on conscience, that human attribute by which we can perceive, if through a glass darkly, the soiled image and likeness of God in our hearts (1 Corinthians, 13:14).

Allow her wisdom, distilled from Aquinas, John Paul II and Benedict XV, to percolate through your brain and heart. I’m sure you’ll agree that I was right to accept her offer.

WT.

Leave a comment

Filed under Daily Reflections

25 September: Mercy is salt and light in Christian Life – Pope Francis.

Francismercy poster

There follows an extract from Pope Francis’s homily at the Canonisation of Mother Teresa, 4 September 2016.

We heard in the Gospel: “Large crowds were travelling with Jesus” (Luke 14:25). Today, this “large crowd” is seen in the great number of volunteers who have come together for the Jubilee of Mercy. You are that crowd who follows the Master and who makes visible his concrete love for each person. I repeat to you the words of the Apostle Paul: “I have indeed received much joy and comfort from your love, because the hearts of the saints have been refreshed through you” (Philemon 1:7). How many hearts have been comforted by volunteers! How many hands they have held; how many tears they have wiped away; how much love has been poured out in hidden, humble and selfless service! This praiseworthy service gives voice to the faith and expresses the mercy of the Father, who draws near to those in need.

pilgrims.wet (640x229)

Following Jesus is a serious task, and, at the same time, one filled with joy; it takes a certain daring and courage to recognise the divine Master in the poorest of the poor and to give oneself in their service. In order to do so, volunteers, who out of love of Jesus serve the poor and the needy, do not expect any thanks or recompense; rather they renounce all this because they have discovered true love. Just as the Lord has come to meet me and has stooped down to my level in my hour of need, so too do I go to meet him, bending low before those who have lost faith or who live as though God did not exist, before young people without values or ideals, before families in crisis, before the ill and the imprisoned, before refugees and immigrants, before the weak and defenceless in body and spirit, before abandoned children, before the elderly who are on their own. Wherever someone is reaching out, asking for a helping hand in order to get up, this is where our presence – and the presence of the Church which sustains and offers hope – must be.

Mother Teresa, in all aspects of her life, was a generous dispenser of divine mercy, making herself available for everyone through her welcome and defence of human life, those unborn and those abandoned and discarded. She was committed to defending life, ceaselessly proclaiming that “the unborn are the weakest, the smallest, the most vulnerable”. She bowed down before those who were spent, left to die on the side of the road, seeing in them their God-given dignity; she made her voice heard before the powers of this world, so that they might recognize their guilt for the crime of poverty they created. For Mother Teresa, mercy was the “salt” which gave flavour to her work, it was the “light” which shone in the darkness of the many who no longer had tears to shed for their poverty and suffering.

mercy.carving. (328x640)Her mission to the urban and existential peripheries remains for us today an eloquent witness to God’s closeness to the poorest of the poor. Today, I pass on this emblematic figure of womanhood and of consecrated life to the whole world of volunteers: may she be your model of holiness! May this tireless worker of mercy help us to increasingly understand that our only criterion for action is gratuitous love, free from every ideology and all obligations, offered freely to everyone without distinction of language, culture, race or religion. Mother Teresa loved to say, “Perhaps I don’t speak their language, but I can smile”. Let us carry her smile in our hearts and give it to those whom we meet along our journey, especially those who suffer. In this way, we will open up opportunities of joy and hope for our many brothers and sisters who are discouraged and who stand in need of understanding and tenderness.

Leave a comment

Filed under Daily Reflections, Year of Mercy

Sunday 19th June: How much mercy is too much?

close up of water droplets over wet surface

Quality of mercy: Merchant of Venice, IV:1

Image from https://uk.pinterest.com

How much mercy is too much?

Galatians 5:13-18 …’the whole of the Law is summarised in a single command: “Love your neighbour as yourself”.’

When I see my sisters and brothers suffering the effects of sin, I can love them as myself by imagining myself in their place.  If I were in their position, how much mercy would I want to be given?  That is very different from asking how much mercy I would expect.

In desiring mercy for myself, I can dream bigger than my expectations.  How much is too much?  What might the Good Thief tell us (Luke 23:39-43)?  He expected his death sentence from human justice but he received from God’s mercy what he dared to hope for – a place with Jesus in the eternal Kingdom (Terms and conditions did not apply).

Is it possible that God, the source of all mercy, could be less merciful than any human sinner?  The idea seems absurd.  It follows, therefore, that however much mercy I can show to another person, God could not possibly show less to me.  This is how I am assured that my own sins are forgiven by the Father to the extent that I forgive my neighbour (Matthew 6:12, 15).  So, how much forgiveness should I show towards my neighbour?  Well, it is a question of how much I really long to receive from God.  It is only human justice that places limits on mercy.  Where human law condemns and exacts punishment, the Law of God simply says, ‘”Love your neighbour as yourself”’.

FMSL

 

Leave a comment

Filed under Daily Reflections, Year of Mercy

17 June, Year of Mercy: Release from Madness

mercy.door (477x640)

mercylogoOur lives are short. When they end, does a door simply close, or do our gifts, lovingly shared, also leave a trace of our passing? The name ’Swanston’ above this tutor’s office in Eliot College, of the University of Kent, quietly commemorates Hamish Swanston, a previous staff lecturer. He was the first Roman Catholic professor in an English university since the Reformation.

A number of Franciscan and Redemptorist students from the Franciscan Study Centre, who took degrees at the university, also took his classes. He was a splendidly energising lecturer, always keen to celebrate life’s varied potential. His approach to theology embraced poetry, music, drama and all sorts of story-telling.

Acts of the Apostles played a key role in his understanding of the mission-minded character of Christianity’s liturgical communities. Those willing to be launched on a transforming path in their lives can take a great deal of encouragement from his books, even long after his death in 2013. Titles such as The Kings and the Covenant, A Language for Madness and Handel provide a sparkling adventure for believers, inner journeys whereby they may learn to achieve far more creative uses of the gifts of the Spirit of God in their relationships.

 And without controversy great is the mystery of godliness; He who was manifested in the flesh, Justified in the spirit, Seen of angels, Preached among the nations, Believed on in the world, Received up in glory. 1 Timothy 3:16

He saw the early creeds, which were hymns such as 1 Timothy 3:16, as intended to stir the heart, to make people plunge into God. Mercy could then reach them in their many shocks and terrors. A community of friendships could lead them back from their insanity.

 

CD.

Leave a comment

Filed under Daily Reflections