Tag Archives: study

An Invitation.

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Kent’s answer to California: Margate, looking across to T’s apartment.

Dear Friends,

I had a message from our contributor Doug Woelke in California, inviting all Agnellus readers to join in the on-line summer school course organised by RCIA in his Mission.

It certainly looks worthwhile! Doug writes:

If you could be so kind and visit the web site, click on the Summer Bible Study Tab, and take a look around.  Although I have a schedule for the course, the timeline is more for me to meet than for participants to adhere to…the beauty of an online study is that folks can opt in at their leisure. click on the Summer Bible Study Tab, and take a look around. 

You can visit the website here: www.missionbiblestudy.com I have copied the course syllabus below; as Doug says, you can take your time to get the taste of what the Scripture is about by concentrating on small extracts. I urge you to take a closer look.

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Creation – Course Syllabus

  • At the start of each session, you will be given a few short questions or ideas to consider when reading, pondering, and studying the source reading for each weekly session.
  • TAKE YOUR TIME…you have all week to read and reread the references…ponder, meditate, and pray on the readings.

Course Outline

Week 1 (11 – 17 June 2017) Introduction to the Creation of the World (Gen 1:1-2:3)
Week 2 (18 – 24 June 2017) Creation:  Day One  (Gen 1:1-5)
Week 3 (25 June – 1 July 2017) Creation:  Day Two (Gen 1:6-8)

02-08 July 2017 – No Session (Holiday Week)

Week 4 (09 – 15 July 2017)  Creation:  Day Three (Gen 1:9-13)
Week 5 (16 – 22 July 2017)  Creation:  Day Four (Gen 1:14-19)
Week 6 (23 – 29 July 2017)  Creation:  Day Five (Gen 1:20-23)
Week 7 (30 July – 05 August 2015)  Creation:  Day Six (Gen 1:24-31)
Week 8 ( 06 – 12 August 2017) Creation:  Day Seven (Gen 2:1-3)
Week 9 (13 – 19 August 2017)  Review of the Creation Story (Gen 1:1-2:3)

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Doug sent this picture of the Holy Door at his church, the Mission of San Luis Rey. The door is open, you are welcome to enter!

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28 January: Saint Thomas Aquinas

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I’m getting better at saving snippets that might come in for the blog. I found this a month ago: a Tablet* report on Pius XI responding to a lecture on Augustine and Thomas Aquinas.

” The thought rising in our mind in beholding these two great Saints is that in certain things they are capable of imitation. We see the never satisfied, indefatigable, almost infinite care of Saint Augustine in his continual revision of his writings, reading, re-reading the works he had written, reviewing, correcting and perfecting them with a diligence verily heroic, offering in such a way the admirable conjunction of unequalled care in the most minute details, with a study which mounted to the heights of genius. We mark the same thing in Saint Thomas, and we recall with pleasure the days when we were librarian at Milan and at the Vatican, and recall the autograph kept there of Saint Thomas in which we see the most precise care even of the writing itself. We see a scrupulous fidelity to the rules of writing, with the greatest care not to disturb the clearness of the writing. And [we] see the most exquisite asceticism nourished by the most solid theology. That is  how truly these two giants of study may be imitated. Study and piety, diligent fruitful study, true, profound and solid piety. Study demands from piety the divine recompense which it alone can give, piety demands from study the splendours of knowledge.

” Study and piety, these two must never be forgotten by our beloved sons, who … must have in them that which was manifested in these two great souls—the identification of study and piety—of science and charity.”

Cut through the flowery language and Pope Pius is saying something important. Prayer and study  depend on each other, as do science and love. Now there’s a thought. Precise care is a mark of science as it is of theology: what’s the quarrel about?

*10/5/30 The TABLET 10 May, 1930, p623.

Saint Thomas Aquinas by Carlo Crivelli

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INTERRUPTION: Friends of FISC AGM

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FISC Chapel by CD.

If you can come to the meeting after 10.00 a.m. Mass, welcome! MMB.

Friends of the Franciscan International Study Centre

Annual General Meeting, June 5, 2016

Draft Agenda

  1. Introduction – chairholder

 

  1. Apologies for absence

 

  1. Minutes of last AGM

 

  1. Matters Arising

 

  1. Principal’s Report – Fr Tom Reist

 

  1. Financial Report – James Somerville-Meikle

 

  1. Chairholder’s Report – Maurice Billingsley
  • Liturgy and Prayer
  • Gifts to Departing Students
  • Social Events past and future
  • Agnellus Mirror Blog
  • Ecumenism
    • Churches Together in Canterbury
    • Credit Union and other support for neighbours
    • January 2017

 

  1. Any Other Business

 

 

Matters may be drawn to the chairholder’s attention by email: maurice.billingsley1@btopenworld.com

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Franciscan Studies in Canterbury

  Another word from our sponsors!

If you want to learn more about Franciscan life and thought, the first course below might interest you.

The second is maybe for you if you feel ‘What? Novice Mistress (or Master) – me? Help!’ If you are appointed to the community in a house of formation, start here! You’ll find plenty of wisdom among the staff and your fellow students, who come from different branches of the Franciscan family in different parts of the world.

The Franciscan International Study Centre, Canterbury, is now accepting applications for our Certificate in Franciscan Studies and Certificate in Training for Franciscan Formation.

These two six-month programmes, which are internally accredited but at present not externally validated, begin on 10 October 2016 and end on 17 March 2017.

For more information email info@franciscans.ac.uk or call 01227 769349.

Read more about the Centre here: http://www.franciscans.ac.uk/

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A Sabbatical with the Franciscans in Canterbury

 

Monica Tobon, who writes for this blog as MLT, has another life, teaching at the Franciscan International Study Centre Canterbury (FISC) and bringing the Centre’s new website to birth.

She has just issued, on behalf of the centre, this invitation to join our community for one or more terms from October 2016 to June 2017. We have welcomed students from all around the world, women and men, religious, priests and lay; some Franciscans in all those  groups, others not. We would gladly welcome you.

WT.

The Franciscan International Study Centre, Canterbury, is now accepting applications for our Sabbatical Programme 2016-17. We offer a welcoming community, peaceful atmosphere and beautiful hilltop location overlooking the ancient pilgrim city of Canterbury.

For Michaelmas Term the theme is Scripture; for Lent Term, Franciscan Studies, and for Trinity Term, Spirituality. Sabbaticals can last for between one and three terms.

Sabbatical students are also free to attend all modules of our Certificate in Franciscan Studies and most modules of our Certificate in Training for Franciscan Formation.

For more information email Monica Tobon, monica.t@franciscans.ac.uk, or call 01227 769349.

Read more about the Centre here: http://www.franciscans.ac.uk/

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Autumn view of Canterbury from near FISC, Eleanor Billingsley.

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Mentoring

My Former Office at FISC

My Former Office at FISC, by CD.

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Classroom at FISC, by CD.

Mentoring

When I was first teaching at the Franciscan Study Centre, in the Nineties, this first room was my office, and the second, a classroom. Individual attention was our aim, whenever that seemed likely to be beneficial. Students from the University and the Study Centre occasionally asked for scholarly supervision. But each person’s circumstances were different. Topics were diverse, and the conversations very dissimilar.

I recall, for instance, an Ethiopian Capuchin Franciscan talking about his family’s hard times, his experience of being ostracised, and the breakdown of Christian sympathy between Catholics and Copts in his home area. A caring manner and willingness to listen counted for more than his items of academic reading.

On another, much more cheerful occasion, I remember the bright-eyed enthusiasm of a third year BA student, relating to me her chosen dissertation topic: depictions in religious art of the angelic Annunciation to Mary. I had very little to do. She had found abundant material, and it was obvious that her keenness would produce a fine piece of writing, as it proved to be.

A third consultation involved a young man with no faith background. He took theology as his course, but he wanted a journalist’s career. He expected to transfer enjoyment of symbolism and storytelling to writing for GQ magazine! Christians use images and metaphors from Homer: surely more of such themes would prove commercially profitable! He asked me to suggest further reading. There was a kind of deadness in his voice: a sad memory for me.

CD.

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