Tag Archives: writing

Prayers Please!

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Caernarfon in David’s corner of Wales.

Dear Friends,

Please pray for David Powell, our contributor DBP, who is gravely ill.

It was David who invented the Ossyrians for Agnellus Mirror– aliens who disguised themselves as T, a male human and two male chihuahuas, Alfie and Ajax, when they were sent to earth as, in David’s words: ‘a special observation unit established to closely watch the earth and its strange inhabitants.’ 1

Of course they have been learning lessons in life ever since they pitched up in Margate. An inspired vehicle for reflection on all manner of things. Thank you David!

MMB

1See April 26 2016, ‘Peace on Earth I’ and subsequent posts by various writers.

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Note about the Franciscan Study Centre

 

Our readers will be aware that the Franciscans have closed their Study Centre in Canterbury. This message from Ms Pat Brookhouse, a faithful friend of the Study Centre may answer a few questions about what is happening.
I know that some people were concerned about what was going to happen to some of the contents of the centre. The following has been put together with the help of Br Antony Jukes.
 
 
As Some of you will have seen in the local paper the centre is now owned by a development company “Empiric Student Property”.
I thought you might also like to know how the contents of the centre have been dispersed.
 
The new owner requested that the houses and contents remain intact so that they could continue to rent them out to students.  They also requested that the kitchen be left open though the rest of the main building was to be left empty.
 

The Contents of the Library.

General Philosophy went to St Bonaventure’s College in Lusaka, Zambia. General Theology, Scripture, Liturgy etc. went to Holy Trinity College, Harare, Zimbabwe. Most of the caged section of the library went to second hand specialist booksellers. A few of the very old rare books will be auctioned by Sotheby’s in the hope that they will find a new home and owner who can properly maintain them.
 
The Franciscan collection has gone to St Mary’s University Twickenham and it is their intention to put on a Franciscan weekend possibly in the new year with invited speakers. They are wanting to use the collection and so it is hoped that in the future they may try to put together a Franciscan course of some sort.

Chapel and General Fittings

The Organ has gone to Fr. Stefan’s Conventual Community in Romania. Many things including the altar and lectern have gone to Ramsgate (the old Benedictine Abbey) which is now The Divine Retreat Centre run by the Syro-Malibar community. They also took most of the furniture from the main building. The Stations of the Cross will remain nearby: the University of Kent Catholic Chaplain, Fr Peter Geldard, has accepted these with the stand for the tabernacle, to furnish their new chapel. The statue of St Francis will be erected within Saint Thomas’ Church, Canterbury.

And various other items have found homes.

Thank you Pat, for your efforts in gathering this information.

HARVESTCHAPEL

May the Harvest of FISC be abundant: One sows, another reaps.

WT

 
 
 
 
 

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15 July: Feast of Saint Bonaventure

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Saint Bonaventure was born in the small Italian town of Bagnoregio, near Viterbo, probably in 1217. He studied at the University of Paris, where he joined the Order of Friars Minor. He later taught and became a Master in the school of theology at the same university. He wrote many great academic works of theology.

In 1257, at the age of forty, he was called unexpectedly out of his academic world to become the Minister General of his Order, responsible for leading all the Friars Minor worldwide. He was the seventh successor of Saint Francis of Assisi in this role. In his new role as Minister General, he managed to continue teaching through his writing. His writings of this period were less esoteric and more concerned with spirituality in the lives of the friars and the Christian people they served.

Saint Bonaventure had a gift for uniting different schools of thought into a harmonious synthesis. He used this gift through his writing in efforts to bring peace among opposing factions in his Order and later in the service of the worldwide Church. He was consecrated Cardinal Archbishop of Albano in 1273. He then assisted in preparations for the Second Council of Lyon in 1274, where he played a key role in the efforts to unite the Eastern and Western Christian churches.

Having put his energies into a General Chapter of his Order and then three sessions of the great Church Council in the same year, 1274, he died at the friary in Lyons on 15th July, aged around fifty seven. The Pope and those who had attended the Council, both Eastern and Western Christians were present for his funeral. Saint Bonaventure was canonised in 1482 and declared a Doctor of the Church in 1588.

Saint Bonaventure; tireless Franciscan teacher, writer and peacemaker, pray for us.

FMSL

Saint Bonaventure at Saint Antony’s Church, Rye, Sussex.

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27 February: Full Stop.

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Full stop,

where my sentence ends.

I have run out of words again.

Again my sentence ends

at a full stop.

Will you not take my waiting pen

at this full stop?

Then you and I shall write again.

But all I can give you

is my full stop,

and my waiting pen.

Sometimes life seems to come to a full stop. Something ends and we don’t know what comes next. Or perhaps we just recognise the need for a pause before we set out again

In something written – as with this piece – a full stop marks the end of one line of thought. If we are reading aloud, a full stop allows a breath – a pause – before we begin again. Full stops might seem to oppose the natural flow, but we need that breath. When writing it gives space to consider what it is we want to communicate and the ways we might do so. When reading we gain the time to take in what we have read: what is being said and what is its significance?

Like a piece of writing our life with God will have plenty of full stops. They exist not to impede our activity but to empower it. Some are like the ending of a chapter. We retire or change jobs, or move home, or experience the difficult ending of a relationship. Or perhaps the full stop feels more as if it is inside us: we sense it’s time to stop something that has been significant in our life. It’s time to move on. But to what? The pause invites us to let God in. We might be tempted to rush on to the next sentence – any old sentence – to avoid this uncomfortable halt in progress. But that would be a mistake. We need a deep breath of God; it will help us see where we have been going and where the road might now lead us.

Some full stops are smaller: not the end of a chapter or even a paragraph but a break within the activity of reading or writing. ‘Sometimes’ Etty Hillesum wrote in her journal, ‘the most important thing in our whole day is the rest we take between two deep breaths or the turning aside in prayer for five minutes.’ These full stops are the intentional way we abide in Christ and draw life from Christ’s abiding in us. We have space to listen to the events of our day and what has been happening within us. We remember that we move forward together. As on the written page the stops are small but frequent. They help rather than hinder the flow of our activity, giving meaning and shape to what we do.

So as you write, or read, or live this day, put in the necessary punctuation.

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Mentoring

My Former Office at FISC

My Former Office at FISC, by CD.

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Classroom at FISC, by CD.

Mentoring

When I was first teaching at the Franciscan Study Centre, in the Nineties, this first room was my office, and the second, a classroom. Individual attention was our aim, whenever that seemed likely to be beneficial. Students from the University and the Study Centre occasionally asked for scholarly supervision. But each person’s circumstances were different. Topics were diverse, and the conversations very dissimilar.

I recall, for instance, an Ethiopian Capuchin Franciscan talking about his family’s hard times, his experience of being ostracised, and the breakdown of Christian sympathy between Catholics and Copts in his home area. A caring manner and willingness to listen counted for more than his items of academic reading.

On another, much more cheerful occasion, I remember the bright-eyed enthusiasm of a third year BA student, relating to me her chosen dissertation topic: depictions in religious art of the angelic Annunciation to Mary. I had very little to do. She had found abundant material, and it was obvious that her keenness would produce a fine piece of writing, as it proved to be.

A third consultation involved a young man with no faith background. He took theology as his course, but he wanted a journalist’s career. He expected to transfer enjoyment of symbolism and storytelling to writing for GQ magazine! Christians use images and metaphors from Homer: surely more of such themes would prove commercially profitable! He asked me to suggest further reading. There was a kind of deadness in his voice: a sad memory for me.

CD.

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