Tag Archives: Creation

March 14: Love Triumphant

Adam&Eve (391x640)

 

Another poem from Radclyffe Hall, sometime parishioner at Saint Anthony’s, Rye.

LOVE TRIUMPHANT

Ere the first grief was born
Love was.
And after griefs are gone
Love still shall triumph on.
Ere the first grief was born
Love was.
In Eden grief became
Love’s slave.
For in the dust and woe
Lost Adam still could know
Fond recompense, and so
Did grief become Love’s slave.
Grief as love’s slave: grief, Radclyffe Hall seems to suggest, did not keep Adam from loving God and Eve. His new self-knowledge, however incomplete, showed him he needed love. Fond recompense for his sin came in the shape of his love of God, his love of Eve; love in each case reciprocal. God’s love was there before Adam and Eve came to grief; God’s  love, humble unto death, continues to sustain their children.

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Integrity of Creation – Laudato Si’ in Zambia.

integrity-of-creation-01blog

Follow this link to read how a rural parish in Zambia is working to renew the face of the earth. An interesting post by Benjamin Itungabose, M.Afr.

Laudato Si’ in Zambia

WT.

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12 February: Wonder and Bewilderment.

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I  call Friar Chris’s posts this week ‘Reflections from St Thomas’s Hill’ and I enjoyed rereading them, one after another, when I’d slotted them into the blog calendar. You may like to go back through them at the end of the week. Will.

 

BOing! was a Festival for children held on the Kent University campus over the last weekend of August 2016. This strange structure, called Mirazozo Luminarium by Architects of Air is like a series of neon-lit tent tunnels, winding paths through beautiful green and red light and colour. The visitors’ playful antics are transmitted by CCTV to other places on the campus. Is this wonder, fantasy or anti-reality? It is like the children’s games used by primary school teachers, such as asking groups of six children how they imagine a space creature, with suitable bodies and facial expressions. They move around to eerie music such as comes from a Moog synthesizer. Making a ‘Spooky Garden’ is another game like this, with play-acted statues.

But internet and video games nowadays can make this virtual world normal for many adults. Toffler’s Future Shock (1970) saw much modern experience as “mass bewilderment in the face of accelerating change.” There is disproportion between our low human complexity and high technological special effects. Emmanuel Sullivan (Baptized into Hope), as an Anglican Franciscan, asks how we develop sensitivity to those around us. “The ongoing mystery of creation and redemption is a meeting of waters, of life and values, of thought and emphasis. At times it is a gentle flowing together; at others the meeting takes place in a mighty roar.” God gives us, if we are open, “the courage and love we need to tolerate and integrate a diversity of Christian life and witness.” But we must consider, are we moving effectively on from fantasy and eerie music to solutions for bewilderment, a genuine witness to hope?

CD.

January 2017.

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7 February: God’s work of art

 

tues-7-bluebells

Today is Tuesday in the Fifth week in Ordinary time.

Our first reading from the Book of Genesis (1:20-2:4) is the story of how God created the heavens and earth. After his work, God rested to enjoy his creation. The story tells us of how good and beautiful the work of God is. I invite you to now to look at how beautiful the flowers are; and how beautiful you are yourself. This will give you an idea of how beautiful God is because he created you and I in his own image and likeness. If all that God had created is good, are you not good? Or do you see yourself as one who is not good and for that reason, nothing good can come out of you? Your Creator, who made you in his own image said that all He created is good, And for that reason, you are very good. You have been blessed by God, so you are fruitful, you will multiply and you will conquer.
The teaching of God for you and me in the Gospel of Mark 7: 1-13 is to put first the law of God and not our human traditions. So, as God told us in the first reading: subdue the earth, fulfil and multiply.
Let us thank God for the wonder of our being and for the whole of creation, for we are wonderfully and beautifully made and blessed by God.

FMSL

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30 January: A week with Rabindranath Tagore: II

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Listen, my heart,

to the whispers of the world

with which it makes love to you.

 

Stray Birds XIII, Collected Poems and Plays p288.

And love the world in return, the people in it but love also our common home, Laudato Si’!

MMB.

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20 January: Crossing Barriers, Week of Prayer for Christian Unity, Canterbury.

gatenrDoddington (564x800)

Quenin Gate Friday 20th January, 8.30‐9am

Christ Church, North Holmes Road, CT1 1QU

Education and creativity

Quenin Gate, leading into the grounds of the Cathedral was used by the monks of St Augustine’s Abbey, Canterbury’s oldest educational establishment. Today we pray for all those who teach or study in our schools, colleges and universities, for the ability to learn well and to think creatively.

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27 December: Big is Small.

1964-110-1-CX (2)

The cross shines into the stable in Blake’s Nativity

There is something ridiculous from a human point of view about the whole Christian story. It’s not as though we need Richard Dawkins to point that out to us. Saint Paul got there first and what he says about Christ crucified applies equally to Christ new-born:

We preach Christ crucified, unto the Jews indeed a stumbling block, and unto the Gentiles foolishness: But unto them that are called, both Jews and Greeks, Christ the power of God, and the wisdom of God. For the foolishness of God is wiser than men; and the weakness of God is stronger than men.

1Corinthians 1:23-25

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Over at the Vatican Observatory website, Fr James Kurzynski has been grappling with new research that suggests there are two trillion galaxies – galaxies, not stars – in the Universe. He concludes with these words:

According to the definition of the Sacred Name, God IS, God’s understanding of creation is not limited to the musing of the human person. Therefore, it very well might be that to God every microorganism is a universe and every universe is a microorganism. The God who Is, the God who is Being, can at the same time be present to the grandeur of the totality of all creation, both known and unknown, seen and unseen, while at the same time be present to the smallest singularity in which the potential of a two trillion galaxy universe resides. In short, God transcends our limited language of small and big, helping us understand that the God who brought all things into existence is also aware of the smallest of things in existence, even, to quote Scripture, the hairs on our head and the sparrows of the sky.

Reflection: How do you perceive your place in God’s creation? Does it fill you with awe and wonder or do you feel a bit deflated, feeling small and insignificant? In [this] season, let us remember that we believe in a God who both brought into existence an unthinkably big creation, but also entered into our smallness in the womb of Mary. And may we open our hearts to God [at] Christmas and allow God’s infinite love to enliven our soul through the intimacy of Christ’s love for us and the stirrings of the Holy Spirit.

Do find time over the next few days to read Fr Kurzynski’s essay in full HERE.

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Reminder: Advent Retreat, Waiting, Watching, Awakening Saturday December 3.

Dear Friends,

We would like to invite you to the Advent Retreat on Saturday  December 3. Please reply to Christopher Chapman directly at the email address below.

sunset-wble

Waiting, Watching, Awakening

A retreat day for Advent

Saturday December 3rd, 10 am to 3 pm

At the Franciscan International Study Centre, Giles Lane, Canterbury, CT2 7NA

The Christian year begins not with the great feasts of Christmas, Easter or Pentecost but with waiting. Advent is in many ways a stark season – a time to be in touch with our deepest desires and needs. It is a season of longing directed towards Christ, revealed as God-with-us, Emmanuel. Advent is a season of waiting, but in hope and in expectation.

The day will be led by Christopher Chapman, an experienced retreat leader and spiritual guide. He is the author of Seeing in the Dark [Canterbury Press 2013].

Programme for the day

Coffee and tea will be available from 9.30am

10am               Introduction to the day

10.15am          Waiting with Creation

10.45am          Quiet space with prayer exercises provided

11.30am          Watching with the Prophets

12 noon          Quiet space with prayer exercises provided

12.30pm          Lunch [please bring your own]

1.15pm            The awakening of Christ within

2pm                Quiet space with prayer exercises provided

2.40pm            Gathering and prayer

3pm                 Tea and depart

Suggested donation for the day £10, or what you can afford.

To help with the organisation of the day please let us know that you intend to come.

Contact Christopher Chapman: chapmans314@btinternet.com      01227 479498

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‘John Duns Scotus on the Uniqueness of the Human Person’: Ex Corde Lecture

Please note change of date to November 30

‘John Duns Scotus 

on the Uniqueness of the Human Person’

Wednesday 30 November

7pm to 8pm

At the Franciscan Study Centre, Giles Lane,

Canterbury, CT2 7NA

scotus-reading

Given by Sr. Mary Elizabeth Share FMDM

Scotus affirms the importance and the dignity of each person.

Each and every individual is endowed with a special value and uniqueness. There has never been nor will there ever be another individual being identical to you or to me; not even a clone.

God created each and every human person utterly and entirely unique.

All are welcome. An opportunity to ask questions will follow the lecture.

We ask for a small donation to cover costs.

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Ex Corde Lectures: ‘John Duns Scotus on the Uniqueness of the Human Person’

Please Note the change of date to November 30

‘John Duns Scotus 

on the Uniqueness of the Human Person’

Wednesday 30 November

7pm to 8pm

At the Franciscan Study Centre, Giles Lane,

Canterbury, CT2 7NA

scotus-reading

Given by Sr. Mary Elizabeth Share FMDM

Scotus affirms the importance and the dignity of each person.

Each and every individual is endowed with a special value and uniqueness. There has never been nor will there ever be another individual being identical to you or to me; not even a clone.

God created each and every human person utterly and entirely unique.

 

All are welcome. An opportunity to ask questions will follow the lecture.

We ask for a small donation to cover costs.

fidc-banner

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Filed under Daily Reflections, Interruptions