Tag Archives: work

3 July: Praying with Pope Francis: Our Families.

Adrian and Carolyn get married

 

We pray that today’s families may be accompanied with love, respect and guidance.

Mrs Turnstone and I took pride in being around for our children. Then they started to grow up, and we had to as well! Actually, it was often the children who accompanied their parents with love, respect and guidance.

Love: how about breakfast in bed sometime before 6.00 a.m. – dry cereal in a sardine can, because the pre-schoolers could not heave the milk down from the fridge, and the can did duty for various games, usually as a doll’s bed.

Respect: as in wanting to go to work, gardening with one or the other parent, doing as we did.

Guidance: for example, shaking their father, guilty of falling asleep while reading bedtime stories, or dictating a dress code: If you ever come to school in that coat again …

Trivial examples which point to the love, respect and guidance there should be within the family. Sometimes it’s difficult: ‘Will,’ one mother said to me, ‘Annie is the first of my four kids to do exams. I can’t help her because I never did them either.’ Such families are often honestly doing their best and need support, not condemnation.

Let us remember them this month. Perhaps it’s as well exams were scrapped this year because of the corona virus!

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June 23, Intergalactic exploration XXXV: The best of all possible worlds?’

Ajax and Alfie

Downstairs in a pandemonium of claws then out into the spring sunshine. T had hardly noticed the weather, being absorbed in collating a report on Random Acts of Kindness between Earthly Species. The chihuahuas had contributed to the field-work, or rather park-work, that lay behind this thesis. They maintained, from a canine perspective, that when a dog looked at a human eye-to-eye, with tongue at half-mast in what some people called a smile, it was the dog initiating the exchange of kindness, not the human who scratched the dog between the ears or under the chin.

It was well drilled into the chihuahuas that they did not enter Peter’s Fish Factory. ‘After all’, said T, ‘You never went near the kitchen in Ossyria.’ ‘As if anyone ever would!’ retorted Alfie. ‘I never knew where they were, and I never wanted to.’ He broke off as T entered the shop, then turned to Ajax. ‘Well done, getting him out of the apartment. He’s spent too long on that report that will never be read. Even if it gets back to Ossyria, it will be suppressed. Random Acts of Kindness would upset the whole system. What’s the point of them in the best of all possible worlds?’

‘Best of all possible worlds? I don’t quite believe that any more.’ Ajax would have said more, but T had come out of Peter’s carrying a big paper bag with a blue fish printed on the side. ‘Beach steps or Winter Gardens?’ asked T. ‘Gardens’, came the reply. Aggressive, hungry gulls were intimidating to lowly chihuahuas, and there was more cover in the gardens. If necessary, a dog could hide under a bench, though not too close to another dog who might fancy the same morsel, or receive a larger whitebait.

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18 June, Going viral XXXVIII: Bikes for nurses and other care staff.

There was a cheering story in the London Evening Standard the other day.

Brompton cycles have made available to NHS workers in London hundreds of their classic folding bikes so that they can safely get to and from work, with a little exercise in between. And then came this interesting observation.

Julian Scriven, director of Brompton bike hire, said: “It’s fantastic to see so many people embracing cycling. What I find so inspiring is the comments from NHS staff and who say it gives them a moment to decompress from a long shift at the hospital to coming back home.

“If we can help the NHS team have that moment to clear their minds and avoid taking their work home with them then I consider it a job well done.”

We at the Mirror did not need Mr Scriven to tell us how good cycling is for our physical, mental and spiritual health. See May 22 last year. As far as I’m concerned, once I’m zoned out in the saddle, senses on autopilot keeping me safe, I can let the Spirit blow within. It was always good as a barrier for not taking work home. So Bravo Brompton! This link takes you to the article in the Standard and the crowd-funding appeal for more bikes. Ross Lydall ES 1.6.20

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Going Viral XLII : Rev Jo’s Perspective, continued

Canterbury Cathedral by Ines. The Cathedral is open for private prayer in the evening.


Today is one of those ‘mile stone’ days for our high street in terms of many of our shops re-opening, and in recognition of all the amount of work that would have taken place, and covid risk assessments that would have been carried out (something we all have to do, ourselves included). We must remain ever mindful for those in hospitality and arts that have not been given the green light for opening. As chaplain to the Marlowe theatre, they are all particularly in my prayers, at this very difficult time.
Re opening our churches for private prayer: following your feedback last week, we have decided against the opening of our church buildings for private prayer, but are focusing our energies on preparing them for public worship, as and when we are advised – this week am picking up 5litres of hand sanitizer, which I ordered in March, and has now arrived! I am of course available for prayer requests, by appointment, and could meet outside. 

However, the cathedral will be offering limited opening times for private prayer: Monday – Friday 4.30pm – 8.00pm, and 10.00 – 4.00 Sat & Sun.


Today in Morning Prayer, we were asked to remember Evelyn Underhill, who from the mid-1920’s she became highly regarded as a retreat conductor and influential spiritual director. I will leave you with some of her quotes to ponder:
“We mostly spend [our] lives conjugating three verbs: to Want, to Have, and to Do… forgetting that none of these verbs have any ultimate significance, except so far as they are transcended by and included in , the fundamental verb, to Be.” ~ Evelyn Underhill

“For lack of attention a thousand forms of loveliness elude us every day.” ~ Evelyn Underhill
“My growth depends on my walls coming down.” ~ Evelyn Underhill”

God is always coming to you in the Sacrament of the Present Moment. Meet and receive Him there with gratitude in that sacrament.” ~ Evelyn Underhill

Some attachments I have been sent through which may be of interest from St Augustine’s theological college and the children’s activity sheet.
Morning prayer:https://youtu.be/vvy7b7kj8R4

God Bless, and keep well, keep connected, and keep praying
Jo🙏🙏🙏
Rev Jo RichardsRector of the Benefice of St Dunstan, St Mildred and St Peter, Canterbury

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8 June: Of Syllables and Steps, Singing and Silence: I

eastergarden (640x365)

My wife and I often sit together in silence, or work quietly in the garden together, unafraid of the absence of words. It’s the same when I am working at L’Arche Kent’s garden; most of the time we are all of us content just to get on with our tasks quietly. Gardening is a visual art, and like a good film, the action often proceeds in silence – especially the action of the Unseen Gardener.

For our wedding anniversary once we burrowed under the Channel to Lille, where patronal loyalty drew us to Mass at the Church of Saint Maurice. Silence was an effective part of the liturgy, as was that essential component of the motion picture, the movement of people. Blessed with a big church in a depopulated city centre, priests and congregation opened the Word in the nave before processing towards the altar after the homily.

Before the homily – silence.

For some minutes the priests joined the rest of us in contemplation before the preacher opened his lips. All were ready to listen. Silence had allowed us a period of reflection and, dare I say awe; a deeper hearing of the Word that was enhanced by the homily.

All this is a roundabout reflection on today’s Liturgy just before Corpus Christi. I am firmly in the camp that holds that the language at Mass, spoken and unspoken, should be readily understood by those present. Although mostly the priest is addressing God, there is no need for long or rare words – the Lord knows what we want to say even before we do. What can I give him, poor as I am? I can raise my heart and mind to him, but I often find myself deliberately switching the mind off, as the translation we have now is a stumbling block, inelegant, inharmonious; puzzling rather than enlightening.

And yet …

MMB

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20 May: An Epitaph

We were on our Sunday walk and sat on a bench in Doddington churchyard to break bread together. As the last crumbs were brushed to the ground I said, Let me see whether there are any good carvings here. As you see, I was not disappointed. Beautiful lettering, my daughter observed as she took the photos, and that lovely strawberry sprig; an epitaph speaking of a long life together well-spent.

What will they want to say about you or me? Loved, respected, dedicated? Not that it matters to us what’s said when we’re gone, but we know some things we are good at: if we are graced to earn our living by them. so much the better, but we may rightly be more dedicated to work we are not paid for. Family and community life are callings for almost all of us: let us dedicate ourselves to them daily, in deed if not in word.

Lord, when did we see you hungry and feed you, or thirsty and give you something to drink? Matthew 25:37.

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Going Viral XXX: the rubbish Lorry says it’s Thursday

Good morning and hope this finds you well, as we are here at the Rectory. One of the things I find difficult about this lockdown, is remembering what day it is! Those of you watching Morning Prayer know where I am coming from…is it Wednesday or Thursday, and then the reassuring sound of the  rubbish Lorry (thank you keyworkers) alerted me to the fact that it’s Thursday – but what does differentiate our days? 

Several people have mentioned that this rhythm of prayer (Morning Prayer & Compline), work (paid work or clearing cupboards/gardening), exercise, and rest is very monastic, and something that I have reflected on myself. Last night I caught up with a friend of mine, a sister in a closed convent, and we chatted on Zoom (yes is possible), and how this rhythm to our days was not that dissimilar to their way of life.

May years ago I was introduced to something called Rhythm of life, how each day one should have a quiet time, each week a quiet time (Sabbath), every month maybe a quiet day, every year maybe a retreat – and what this feels like at the moment is a global ‘retreat’, everything has been paused – a chance of reflection, of asking some of the bigger questions, of giving our planet that opportunity to breathe….of action and contemplation. That rhythm of alternating between meeting with God in the quiet place, and then the meeting of God in the busyness of the market place.

Rev Jo Richards, Rector, Benefice of St Dunstan, St Mildred and St Peter, Canterbury.

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Going viral XXVIII: planting in hope.

If I do not use these pictures soon, the moment will have completely passed. On one of our walks we passed these two Kentish orchards, one old, one new. How many years will the old one keep fruiting? And how long will the new one be productive? It represents a massive act of hope in the future, something we all need with the virus restricting our lives. (click on the photo to see the other orchard.)

The tombstone of Harry and Winifred Cuthbert proclaims that they were ‘dedicated’ to farming and fruit growing, witness the strawberry plant seen here. Every seed, every plant is an act of hope. So is a smile, a wave, a word of encouragement.

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2 May: Look at Chapter 13

candle

An evening Taizé service, all three readings taken from 1 Corinthians 12 and 13, each one followed by silence.

After the first reading I felt quite let down: for much of my life, there was no praying for the higher gifts, or even any great feeling of having gifts worth mentioning. Day by day seemed a matter of getting through the agenda: getting up, half-hearted morning offering (Good morning life and all things glad and beautiful), breakfast, commuter trains, waiting for students who might or might not attend the lesson, more trains, sit down to eat with whoever’s at home, prep for next day, sleep more or less well, repeat.

That was how it looked on a cold, damp evening, a year and more into retirement. But at the time it was not all gloom, as this old post makes clear. Good morning life and all things glad and beautiful!

What does Paul say? Just look at Chapter 13: whatever gifts I may have count as nothing, without love. And I dare to say that I loved my work, loved the oddball teenagers I worked with, and even loved the commute. Writing this blog has forced me to open my eyes and look into that mirror where we can see the Lord at work, however dimly. I hope a few readers have enjoyed the reflections our writers have shared.

Good morning life and all things glad and beautiful!

MMB

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27 April: He must walk his grounds

Adam at Canterbury Cathedral, SJC

Robert Herrick, A Good Husband

A Master of a house (as I have read)
Must be the first man up, and last in bed:
With the Sun rising he must walk his grounds;
See this, View that, and all the other bounds:
Shut every gate; mend every hedge that's torn,
Either with old, or plant therein new thorn:
Tread o'er his glebe, but with such care, that where
He sets his foot, he leaves rich compost there.

Robert Herrick lived in turbulent times: 1591-1674. In other words Elizabeth I, James I, Charles I; the revolution and Cromwell; Charles II and the Restoration. ‘Husband’ here means householder as well as spouse. Looking after one’s estate, however small, was important then, and so it is now. Happy gardening and DIY!

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